Last Minute Gift Ideas for Mother’s Day: Inexpensive but Thoughtful Gifts You Can Get (Without Leaving the House!)

Last Minute Gift Ideas for Mother’s Day: Inexpensive but Thoughtful Gifts You Can Get (Without Leaving the House!)

If you're anything like me, you like to do things at the last minute - and if you're buying a gift for your mom this year, this may be one of those things you sorta...waited to do. That's why I figured I'd throw together this quick list of last-minute gift ideas for Mother's day - these are gifts you can order from home and receive in time for Sunday's Mother's day celebrations! Or, have them shipped if you can't or won't see your mother. 

In no particular order, here are some of my favorites!

Sweet Gifts for Mom

 

New Version 2017 - Anti Stress Cube Fidget Toys for Adults / Stress and Anxiety Relief Reducer Toys to Focus/ Attention Relieves Stress Toy for Gifts, ADHD, Kids, Children, Autism

The Gift That Keeps on Giving!

Why not get mom something that will keep giving to her all year long? Try the Find Subscription Boxes Subscription Box App - or just get one of these awesome subscription box services for her!

Does your mom love:

Still not sure? Why not just get her a good old Amazon eGift Card? That'll ensure that she can get whatever she wants or needs! If she loves it, you can always get her a Amazon.com Gift Card Balance Reload next year. Feel too impersonal? Get her the Amazon.com Gift Card in a Floral Box for Mother's Day (Classic White Card Design)

If she isn't sure what to get with her gift card, maybe she wants to try some of these before she buys. So remind her she can also:

Your turn: What are you getting YOUR mom for mother's day? Tell me in the comments!

How to Find a Therapist Who Understands Narcissistic Abuse Recovery & NPD: 10 Powerful Questions

How to Find a Therapist Who Understands Narcissistic Abuse Recovery & NPD: 10 Powerful Questions

When you're going through narcissistic abuse recovery, you might want to find a good therapist. If so, you're obviously going to want one who is familiar with the topic of narcissistic abuse and also has a good understanding of narcissistic personality disorder and the extreme effects being involved with this sort of person can have on your entire life.

Research proves that the most effective therapy happens when the relationship between the client and the therapist is comfortable and where the client feels understood.

This is especially important for narcissistic abuse survivors, because so often, we are starved of any personal validation. We need to know that they "feel" us - feel me?

Ideally, schedule an in-person or telephone interview in advance - or schedule a single session to evaluate the therapist and whether he or she will be a good fit for you.

If you can only ask one question or you prefer to avoid the more direct approach, here's a quick way to find out if your therapist is familiar with narcissistic abuse recovery and narcissistic personality disorder.

Ask the therapist "What is your take on gaslighting? And how would you explain gaslighting to someone who hadn't heard of it before?"

I've had a lot of clients tell me that their therapists aren't familiar with that term, and if they're not, it's a really great sign that they don't know about it. I also suggest, if possible, that you find someone who has at least a bit of personal experience with emotional abuse - and if they have, they'll generally admit that to you. 

How to Interview Your Therapist: 10 Questions to Help Determine if They Can Help with Narcissistic Abuse Recovery

If you've got time for a full-on interview, here are some questions to consider.

1. I'm hoping to work on recovering from an abusive relationship. Are you familiar with narcissistic personality disorder and narcissistic abuse recovery? How would you go about treating that.

2. Regarding your therapy style, do you lean more toward cognitive behavior therapy or digging into the deep psychodynamic root of the problem? If you want to start feeling better by treating symptoms and learning coping techniques, you want a therapist who is more CBT-based, but if you want to reach the root of the problem, you will want to dig into it with a psychodynamic-based therapy style. Ideally, you might want both - so a program that starts by treating the immediate pain and that leads to digging into the root causes as you go. A combined approach would probably be best for you as a narcissistic abuse survivor. It's good to understand how you got there so you won't be there again.

  • Coach tip: If it fits in your budget, get a narcissistic abuse recovery coach along with your therapist. This way, you can focus on learning coping techniques and getting validation from a coach who understands where you are, as well as traditional therapy.

3. Are you more directive or more of a consultant? (Some therapists use really harsh "in your face" kinds of therapy and this is usually not good for survivors). You want to know if they're going to lead the sessions with a tight, planned structure or if they'll let you lead with whatever you're dealing with. I like the idea of a flexible session - so if you want to talk about a specific thing, it's okay to put your planned goals for the scheduled session on hold. (This is how I roll in coaching).

4. Have you ever helped someone like me before? Are you familiar with domestic violence and/or emotional abuse in relationships and what is your best piece of advice for recovering from this kind of trauma?

5. Do you offer phone check-ins or text support between sessions?

6. Will you give me advice if I ask for it specifically?

7. Will you give me assignments and/or coping techniques I can use between sessions for healing and managing during recovery?

8. Who is your ideal client?

9. Is our session completely confidential, or will you disclose details to my insurance company (or employer)?

10. Do you think you can help me?

The Most Important Part: Does it FEEL right?

During the interview, take notes on:

  • How quickly you were able to feel comfortable with the therapist.
  • Whether you felt rushed or if you were allowed to go at a comfortable pace.
  • Whether the therapist seemed to "get" you from the start, or it took several attempts to help them see your point of view or perspective, or to understand what you were trying to explain.
  • Whether you understood the responses clearly and comfortably.
  • Whether you think you'd feel comfortable sharing your deepest secrets with this person.

My best tip? Go with your gut! Use your intuition! Since you might be an empath, pay attention to how the therapist makes you FEEL. You should feel comfortable and not feel the need to hide who you are in any way from this person. You should not feel "judged," just safe.

Suicide Prevention Mission: See Our New Resource List

Suicide Prevention Mission: See Our New Resource List

Suicide Prevention for Narcissistic Abuse Survivors

There's an unfortunate epidemic of victims of narcissistic abuse becoming suicidal, and at QueenBeeing.com, we want to do everything we can to prevent even one person from taking an action that they can't take back. Not only is suicide NOT an option, it's something that will affect so many more people than you realize.

We know it hurts right now, and a lot of us have been there. But please don't do anything to hurt yourself - you can't take it back - and what if you don't succeed? Angie knows a lady who tried to commit suicide and she ended up losing half of her face and will spend the rest of her life in a wheelchair. You don't want that.

Unfortunately, since our members are all over the world, we're not equipped to handle suicide threats. But we know you need help, so we've created this page full of resources that can help you. Check it out if you need it. 

See the Suicide Prevention Resource List

Depression Suicide: What to do if a loved one is Suicidal

Depression Suicide: What to do if a loved one is Suicidal

Depression, characterized by erratic mood swings, loss of interest in hobbies and activities is a very serious emotional disorder affecting about 9.5 per cent of the nation.

Needless to say, it is could be a lot more fatal if a depressed person is heading towards suicide.

Therefore, here are some signs to know if your loved one is considering suicide as a result of depression.

Depression Suicide: Warning Signs to be Aware of

1. Mentions of Suicide or Death

2. Wanting to tie up loose ends or give away personal belongings

3. Engaging in reckless behavior such as heavy alcohol and drug use

4. Withdrawing from family and friends

5. Erratic mood swings

6. Inappropriately saying goodbye.

7. Verbal behavior that is ambiguous or indirect: (for example: "I want to go to sleep and never wake up.", "I'm so depressed, I just can't go on.", "Does God punish suicides?"

Though the signs and warnings may vary from person to person, it is important that you are able to recognize such warnings and take some steps to help your loved one.

Helping a loved one who is showing signs of Depression Suicide

If you believe someone is contemplating suicide do seek help immediately, however there are a several suicide prevention web sites and hotlines available to help those in need, but in case these are not within your reach, you can try the following:

1. Cultivate Physical Closeness: Simple hugs, kisses on the cheeks, loving pats and compliments go a long way in healing a broken heart or depressed mind. Remember, sometimes the little things DO count.

2. If the person is acutely suicidal, do not leave him or her alone.

3. Remember: suicidal behavior is a cry for help. Thus if someone contemplating suicide turns to you, it is likely that he believes that you are more caring and more informed about coping with depression, and more willing to help. This in itself is a positive, thus it will be time to empower yourself to be what a suicidal person views you to be; stronger and you are.

4. Other steps to take include reassuring them that help is available and that with appropriate treatment they can feel better. Try not to patronize them by simply telling them that "everything will be fine," or that "they have everything to live for.

5. Try to search the house for dangerous items such as guns and knives that could be potentially harmful.

In addition to the factors above, if you are of a spiritual inclination, this will be a good time to pray according to the framework of your faith. Indeed, prayer when used effectively can work wonders to aid in curtailing depression suicide.

Moreover, in the hopes that your loved one begins to show signs of improvement from the warnings indicating depression suicide, it will be great to start to include such drug-free approaches for depression treatment such as exercise: namely Yoga, a proper diet for physical health which in turn heals the mind and positive thinking and affirmations.

Naturally we all would get concerned or frightened if a loved one seems on the brink of suicide resulting from depression, however as with all life's problems, if we can catch it early and nip it in the bud, depression suicide can be prevented. If things may have gotten more advanced, then it may be time to seek professional help or as an alternative double up on our efforts to steer the loved one back to a positive outlook on life.

The No-Contact Chronicles: Everything You Need to Know About Going NC With a Toxic Narcissist

The No-Contact Chronicles: Everything You Need to Know About Going NC With a Toxic Narcissist

This is a compilation of help, advice and encouragement on Narcissistic Abuse Recovery for people who are going no contact with a narcissist or considering going no contact from certified life coach Angela Atkinson of QueenBeeing.com.
Join the QueenBeeing Universibee - the online learning and evolution center for narcissistic abuse survivors. You'll really thrive when you join this hive! Join up at http://vid.io/xcxV today!

The No-Contact Chronicles: Everything You Need to Know About Going NC With a Toxic Narcissist

Basics of No Contact:

1. Stop taking the narcissist's phone calls.
2. Block him/her on all social media networks.
3. Do not schedule or encourage visits with the narcissist.
4. Stop seeing, speaking to or in any way interacting with him/her.

It's not rocket science, right? Then why is it so difficult to enact and then to stick to the no contact rule?
On NO CONTACT AND BEING ADDICTED TO THE NARC: There's an evolutionary spin here - the loss of a potCntial baby-making mate would be bad for us as a species. On top of that, humans are hard-wired to develop bonds to other humans - another survival urge.

Add together your need to bond and the need to keep your mate (or to feel great distress in the loss of him/her), and what do you have?

It affects you like a drug, your relationship with this toxic person. And when you're not getting the sweet poison, you might just miss it. A lot like a crack addict might miss his fix.

This compilation contains 8 videos that focus on the No Contact practice.

If you enjoyed this video, please subscribe to my channel! http://youtube.com/angieatkinson

Schedule a coaching appointment with me at http://narcissisticabuserecovery.online

Get my books at http://booksangiewrote.com, schedule a coaching appointment and/or pick up your free 5-day fear-busting email course (specially designed for narcissistic abuse survivors) at http://narcissismsupportcoach.com.