"The first thing you've got to do is, you truly have to believe yourself. Call it gut feeling, intuition, instinct, whatever -- when you get that feeling, that should send off bells. Listen, listen, listen, listen." ~Dr. PhilHow to Identify a Toxic Family Relationship with a Narcissist

As we travel along the road to personal bliss, most of us encounter obstacles along the way.

Sometimes, the obstacles are within our own selves, and other times, they come from external sources.

Toxic relationships, in particular, can be an extreme source of stress and discord in our lives--and can even lead to our own lives spiraling out of our control. Often, toxic relationships involve a narcissist. 

Related: 12 Ways to Know if You're in Love With a Narcissist

It's one thing if the narcissist in your life is a coworker, neighbor or friend. But what if the toxic person in your life isn't just a friend, but a family member?

How do you know if you have a toxic family relationship?

In general, if you feel like you're being emotionally, physically, spiritually or otherwise abused, manipulated or mistreated by any family member on a regular basis, there is an element of toxicity.

Related: 44 Warning Signs You're Being Emotionally Abused

These family members can include your spouse and other nuclear family members, but also extended family such as parents and in-laws, siblings, aunts and uncles, grandparents and other relations.

Your toxic family member may over-criticize you or openly judge you for your personal choices, or they may be a little sneakier about it by gossiping or telling lies about you (or your choices) behind your back.

Related: Top 10 Warning Signs You're Being Gaslighted by a Toxic Narcissist

Some family members may take it to a whole other level and actually attempt to wreak havoc in your life or even to control, destroy or alter your nuclear family, domestic situation or other outside relationships.

Other Signs of a Toxic Family Relationship

  • Overstepping Boundaries--Psychological boundaries are defined as perceptions or beliefs that people hold in relation to their social group memberships, including but not limited to families, as well as their own identities and overall self-concepts. In part, boundaries help us to distinguish ourselves from other people--you know, that thing which separates "I" from "We." Boundaries also help us define how we are linked together within our families and extended families. Toxic family members often have trouble with boundaries. That is, they will often feel entitled to involve themselves in your life on an unhealthy level. They may try to make you feel responsible for their emotions or their circumstances, blame you for things that you have no control over or try to control you and your choices.
  • Unfair or Unrealistic Requirements--Toxic family members generally have different beliefs or perspectives than you when it comes to things like trust, responsibilities, money, time and attention. They may become angry if you don't do as they wish, even if it doesn't directly affect them--but especially if it does. For example, if you are unable to attend a family gathering, a toxic person might try to make you feel guilty or simply stop speaking to you.
  • Double Standards--Many toxic family members hold tightly to their own double standards. For example, they may expect you to keep their secrets or "have their backs" when other people gossip negatively about them, but they can't or won't offer you the same courtesy.
  • Manipulation--Toxic family members are master manipulators--and they will deny it if you call them on it. They will use every manipulation technique at their disposal in order to control you. They may cry, scream, argue, beg--anything they can think of to get you to do what they want, even if what they want isn't what's best for you. And, if the first technique doesn't work, they'll often move down the list.

Co-Dependence and Enmeshment

Enmeshment and co-dependency are two unfortunate byproducts of toxic family relationships. In a co-dependent relationship, one or both family members involved are psychologically influenced or controlled by the other--or they may need that other person to help fulfill their own needs or even to feel whole.

Related: What You Need to Know if You Love a Narcissist

While the term "co-dependent" was originally coined by the Alcoholics Anonymous recovery group, it has since been adopted by psychologists and other mental health professionals.

"A co-dependent person is one who has let another person's behavior affect him or her, and who is obsessed with controlling that person's behavior," says author Melody Beattie, in her book, Codependent No More.

Enmeshment goes hand-in-hand with co-dependence. When you are enmeshed with another person, it means that you depend on that person to define your identity, your sense of being good enough or worthy of having good things in your life, your overall sense of well-being and even your own safety and security. Or, to put it more clearly--you are enmeshed when you can't feel like a whole or satisfied person without the approval or presence of another person.

Being enmeshed with a toxic family member is unhealthy for all involved--it isn't compatible with being an individual. Enmeshment takes away your personal power and the ability to manifest your true desires.

If you think you're in a relationship with a narcissist, check out this resource page - and don't forget to join my new online support group, SPAN, right here. 

Do you have a toxic narcissist in your family? Share your thoughts and experiences in the comments. Let's discuss this. 

Need more help? Don't miss my books on narcissism

Take Back Your Power: How to End People Pleasing, Stop Letting Life Happen to You and Start Getting What You Want

Alive Inside: How to Overcome Toxic Love and Narcissism in Relationships

Take Back Your Life: 103 Highly-Effective Strategies to Snuff Out a Narcissist's Gaslighting and Enjoy the Happy Life You Really Deserve

Your Love is My Drug: How to Shut Down a Narcissist, Detoxify Your Relationships & Live the Awesome Life You Really Deserve, Starting Right Now

See more of my books at BooksAngieWrote.com. Like QueenBeeing, each is geared at somehow improving your life. 

 

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