Queen Bee Symbolism

“In the ancient world, dancing Bees were special – the Queen Bee in particular, for she was the Mother Goddess – leader and ruler of the hive, and was often portrayed in the presence of adoring Bee Goddesses and Bee Priestesses.” ~Deborah DeLong, Romancing the Bee.com

angie you can cal me queen beeFor us at QueenBeeing, the QB represents the feminine power that we each embody and our right to be in control of our own worlds.

The sweetness of honey and its mystical quality; the magic and complexity of the life cycle.

Bees, like women, are essential in nature. And they’re known as Birds of the Muses. The Queen Bee represents a strong spirit for these times of transition. Here are a few other interesting notes on the Queen Bee and her symbolism. 

Learn more about QueenBeeing and the QB Intention. Plus, find out what we mean when we call ourselves Queen Bees

According to GoddessSchool.com:

The precise identity of the Bee Goddess remains a great mystery.  Nevertheless, she is a very strong spirit for these times of  great transition.   Signs of her worship are evident in the Mediterranean cultures of around 3,000 years ago at the temples of Artemis.  She is one of the oldest and  most popular aspects of the Divine Feminine.  

 

There is an ancient Egyptian story that bees were born from a tear in the eye of the sun, touching upon their goldenness, the sense that honey is gold, materialized sunlight.

Samson comes upon a lion, like Samson, the Hebrew word for "of the sun," a creature of the sun, a creature of gold. She tears the lion apart with Her bare hands. Later She finds the lion's carcass filled with bees. She reaches inside and takes some honey in Her hand and eats it. "Out of the eater came what is eaten," says Samson, "and out of the strong came what is sweet": the painful rending of strength, the hard, discloses within it what is soft, the sweetness.

Bee shows us we can accomplish what seems impossible by having dedication and working hard. It asks us to pursue our dreams with incredible focus and fertilize our aspirations. Bee teaches us to cooperate with others who have similar goals so we can learn how to help each other.

And from Pure-Spirit.com:

(The Queen Bee) is a very strong spirit for these times of  great transition.   Signs of her worship are evident in the Mediterranean cultures of around 3,000 years ago at the temples of Artemis.  She is one of the oldest and  most popular aspects of the Divine Feminine.  Born on the Greek Island of Delos,  Artemis was sister of Apollo and daughter to Zeus and Leto.  When she was a young girl, her father, Zeus, asked her what was her dream? She answered that she wished to never have to marry a man and to always be free to roam in the wild forest.  Artemis was known as a patron of young virgins, and a powerful protectress of the natural world of fertility.  As with other early Goddesses, ceremonies to invoke Artemis were held in groves of trees, at places of special rock outcroppings, at sacred sites along rivers or at quiet springs.  Ironically,  Artemis's blessings  were  evenutally  cultivated at exquisite  temple sites constructed throughout the Mediterranean region.

There is an ancient Egyptian story that bees were born from a tear in the eye of the sun, touching upon their goldenness, the sense that honey is gold, materialized sunlight.

Samson comes upon a lion, like Samson, the Hebrew word for "of the sun," a creature of the sun, a creature of gold. She tears the lion apart with Her bare hands. Later She finds the lion's carcass filled with bees. She reaches inside and takes some honey in Her hand and eats it. "Out of the eater came what is eaten," says Samson, "and out of the strong came what is sweet": the painful rending of strength, the hard, discloses within it what is soft, the sweetness.

Bee shows us we can accomplish what seems impossible by having dedication and working hard. It asks us to pursue our dreams with incredible focus and fertilize our aspirations. Bee teaches us to cooperate with others who have similar goals so we can learn how to help each other.

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