Bliss Mission: Hope for the Best

Bliss Mission: Hope for the Best

Humans are unique from other creatures in that we have the ability to reason, and the ability to HOPE. Hope is what keeps us going and moving toward the future.

It’s the ability to believe in the good things in the world. It’s the ability to know that you will prevail over adversity.

Every one of us has found ourselves lacking hope at some time in our lives. And in some of the most difficult conditions, who could blame us?

Even so, the gift of reason tells us that a person without hope is a person without life.

Martin Luther King, Jr. said, “If you lose hope, somehow you lose the vitality that keeps life moving, you lose that courage to be, that quality that helps you go on in spite of it all. And so today I still have a dream.”

With this in mind, how can we cope when we find ourselves feeling hopeless? It’s simply not possible to create personal change in our lives while remaining in this state.

It’s Not Rocket Science, But It Takes Practice

Creating personal change that leads to your own personal bliss can actually be pretty painless. As it turns out, when you take the road that makes you feel good, you’re more likely to be happy and to succeed in your goals.

And don’t forget these important tips.

  • Creating hope in your life can begin with simple affirmations. You can try adding one to your daily routine, something like “All good things are coming to me today” or “I see beauty around me and within me” or “The order of every day is happiness.”
  • Another way to change your outlook is to get some exercise. Play the Wii with your kids or go for an after dinner walk. Dance with the baby or your husband. Move your body and have fun with it.
  • Be aware of your body. If you’re not eating right or sleeping enough, depression can set in.
  • It’s all about your perspective. If you consistently beat yourself up with negativity, you will lose hope. If you focus on positive things and change your perspective, you will find hope seeping into every area of your life.

Give these things a try. Even one small change can bring you one step closer to creating the personal change you desire in your life.

I leave you with one final thought from Winston Churchill.

“The pessimist sees difficulty in every opportunity. The optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty.”

 

Bliss Mission: Hope for the Best

Bliss Mission: Passion and Professional Success

Today’s Affirmations

Professional DreamerMy passion for professional success is renewed each day.

I am born to succeed in a professional environment. And because I know it, I am passionate about it. I know I have the elements it takes to succeed in my career.

Each morning, I naturally regain the energy to take on all of work’s challenges. I feel equipped for everything that comes my way as I move through the day’s tasks. I love the thrill of work and the feeling of accomplishment in the workplace.

I see nothing as unattainable. I utilize my strengths of organization and emotional control to make it through even the roughest tasks.

I know how easy it is to get flustered when it seems there are more responsibilities than hours in the day. I can relate to feeling overwhelmed by all that I am tasked to do. But my approach is to organize in order of priority, and then take one step at a time. I recognize that I accomplish so much more when I pace myself.

At the end of each day, I have more successes because I create a professional and organized environment to work in.

Today, I can maintain the passion needed in my profession because I am driven to succeed. I love the feeling I get when I knock my tasks off one at a time and feel reinvigorated to take on even more tomorrow.

Ask Yourself These Self-Reflection Questions:

1. Are there skills I need to sharpen in my professional life?
2. Can I teach co-workers how to be passionate about their jobs?
3. Am I driven by financial reward?

Bliss Mission: Hope for the Best

3 Steps to a Permanently Clear Desk

English: Untidy Desk

 

Post written by Leo Babauta. Follow me on Twitter.

 

Once upon a time, my desk was cluttered with all the things I was currently working on — not to mention dozens of things I

wasn’t working on: notes, post-its, phone numbers, papers to be filed, stacks of stuff to work on later. I was too busy to organize it, and if I ever did get it cleared, it would pile up soon after.

It’s a different story today. These days, my desk is always clear, except for the one thing I’m working on, and perhaps a notebook and pen for jotting down notes, ideas or to-dos as they come up. It’s a liberating feeling … it calms me … it reduces stress and chaos … it definitely makes things easier to find … and it makes me more efficient and productive.

How did I make the transformation? Well, it wasn’t an easy journey, and I’ve improved over the years, but the basic steps are outlined below. The important thing to remember is that you must have a system in place, and you must teach yourself to follow the system. Otherwise, you just clean your desk, and it gets messy again.

Much of my current system (as opposed to stuff I’ve been trying along the way) is taken almost completely from “Getting Things Done,” by David Allen (via Lifehacker & 43 Folders). A must read if you haven’t yet.

Here’s the system:

1. First, take everything on your desk and in your drawers, and put them in one big pile. Put it in your “in basket” (if it doesn’t fit, pile it next to your desk or something). From now on, everything that comes in must go in your in basket, and you process everything as below.

2. Process this pile from the top down. Never re-sort, never skip a single piece of paper, never put a piece of paper back on the pile. Do what needs to be done with that paper, and then move on to the next in the pile. The options: trash it, delegate it, file it, do it, or put it on a list to do later. In that order of preference. Do it if it takes 2 minutes or less to complete. If it takes more, and you can’t trash, delegate or file it, then put it on a list of to-dos (more on your to-do list in another post).

3. Repeat at least once daily to keep desk clear. The end of the day is best, but I tend to process and tidy up as I go through the day. Once you’ve processed your pile, your desk is clear. You’ve trashed or filed or somehow put everything where it belongs (not on top of your desk or stashed in a drawer). Keep it that way. You must follow the system above: put everything in your inbox, then take action on each piece of paper in the inbox with one of the steps listed. If an item is on your to-do list, you can keep the paper associated with it in an “Action” folder. But you must regularly (daily or weekly) go through this folder to ensure that everything is purged.

It’s that simple. Have a phone number on a post-it? Don’t leave it on top of your desk. File it in your rolodex or contacts program. Have something you need to work on later? Don’t keep the papers on top of your desk. Put it on your to-do list, and file the papers in your Action folder. File or trash or delegate everything else.

Leaving stuff on top of your desk is procrastination (and as a procrastinator, I should know). If you put it off until later, things will be sure to pile up on your desk. Deal with them immediately, make a decision, take action.

What I’ve described is a good habit to learn, but it takes time to learn it. You’ll slip. Just remind yourself, and then do it. Soon it’ll be a habit you have a hard time breaking. And trust me, once you’re used to your desk being clear, you won’t want to break this habit.

Some links:

  • Happiness is a Clean Desk
  • Clean Off Your Desk Day
  • 10 tips for Keep Your Desk Clean and Tidy

See also:

 

 

 

 

Bliss Mission: Hope for the Best

Zen Mind: How to Declutter

Post written by Leo Babauta. Follow me on Twitter.

 

A wall closet in a residential house in the Un...

One of the things that gives me most peace is have a clean, simple home. When I wake up in the morning and walk out into a living room that has been decluttered, that has a minimalist look, and there isn’t junk lying around, there is a calm and joy that enters my heart.

When, on the other hand, I walk out into a living room cluttered with toys and books and extra things all over the place, it is chaos and my mind is frenetic.

I’ve been a simplifier and a declutterer for years now (probably 8-9 years) and I’ve gotten pretty good at it, but I’ve found that you have to keep coming back to revisit your clutter every once in awhile.

Here are my top decluttering tips:

  • Do it in small chunks. Set aside just 15 minutes to declutter just one shelf, and when that shelf or that 15 minutes is up, celebrate your victory. Then tackle another shelf for 15 minutes the next day. Conquering an entire closet or room can be overwhelming, and you might put it off forever. If that’s the case, just do it in baby steps.
  • Set aside a couple hours to do it. This may seem contradictory to the above tip … and it is. It’s simply a different strategy, and I say do whatever works for you. Sometimes, for me, it’s good to set aside part of a morning, or an entire Saturday morning, to declutter a closet or room. I do it all at once, and when I’m done, it feels awesome.
  • Take everything out of a shelf or drawer at once. Whichever of the two above strategies you choose, you should focus on one drawer or shelf at a time, and empty it completely. Then clean that shelf or drawer. Then, take the pile and sort it (see next tip), and put back just what you want to keep. Then tackle the next shelf or drawer.
  • Sort through your pile, one item at a time, and make quick decisions. Have a trash bag and a give-away box handy. When you pull everything out of a shelf or drawer, sort through the pile one at a time. Pick up an item, and make a decision: trash, give away, or keep. Don’t put it back in the pile. Do this with the entire pile, and soon, you’ll be done. If you keep sorting through the pile, and re-sorting, it’ll take forever. Put back only what you want to keep, and arrange it nicely.
  • Be merciless. You may be a pack rat, but the truth is, you won’t ever use most of the junk you’ve accumulated. If you haven’t used it in the last year, get rid of it. It’s as simple as that. If you’ve only used it once or twice in the last year, but know you won’t use it in the next year, get rid of it. Toss it if it’s unsalvageable, and give it away if someone else might be able to use it.
  • Papers? Be merciless, unless it’s important. Magazines, catalogues, junk mail, bills more than a year old, notes to yourself, notes from others, old work stuff … toss it! The only exception is with tax-related stuff, which should be kept for seven years, and other important documents like warranties, birth and death and marriage certificates, insurance, wills, and other important documents like that. But you’ll know those when you see ‘em. Otherwise, toss!!!!
  • If you are on the fence with a lot of things, create a “maybe” box. If you can’t bear to toss something because you might need it later, put it in the box, then close the box, label it, and put it in storage (garage, attic, closet), out of sight. Most likely, you’ll never open that box again. If that’s the case, pull it out after six months or a year, and toss it or give it away.
  • Create a system to stop clutter from accumulating. There’s a reason you have tall stacks of papers all over the place, and big piles of toys and books and clothes. It’s because you don’t have a regular system to keep things in their place, and get rid of stuff you don’t need. This is a topic for another day, but it’s something to think about as you declutter. You’ll never get to perfect, but if you think more intelligently about how your house got cluttered, perhaps you can find ways to stop it from happening again.
  • Celebrate when you’re done! This is actually a general rule in life: always celebrate your accomplishments, no matter how small. Even if you just decluttered one drawer, that’s great. Treat yourself to something delicious. Open that drawer (or closet, or whatever), and admire its simplicity. Breathe deeply and know that you have done a good thing. Bask in your peacefulness.

Other posts about decluttering elsewhere:

See also:

About the Author

leo babauta

created zen habits

wrote focus

became minimalist

adores reading,

plus more

 

 

Bliss Mission: Hope for the Best

The Secret to Being Happy

These last 2 years have been ones of complete upheaval and change. I have failed, succeeded, conquered, lost, gained and

Pink happy

learned a lifetime’s worth in 24 short months. Throughout it all, the one thing that remained constant was my burning desire to be happy.

My whole life, I chased being happy. Always looking for that one thing or someone that will make everything better. I was convinced that if I could just find “the one” I would be okay. I went from relationship to relationship, even in my friendships. And all that pursuit got me was a whole heap of misery.

Because I was chasing the wrong relationship.

I spent all of my time trying to find the one person who would accept and love me for me, yet I wasn’t even willing to give that to myself. It was only when I stopped searching for anything outside of myself that I began to understand what it takes to be happy. Now, that doesn’t mean I don’t need anyone else, humans are social creatures and we need friends and mates, however, my folly lay in needing someone else to make me happy.

That’s impossible.

As fallible beings, it is not possible for one person, or even a handful, to make you happy all of the time.  We fail one another, sometimes even in times of greatest need. We make mistakes and we have a very bad tendency to inadvertently hurt one another. So by seeking fulfillment in others, all I was doing was setting myself up for failure.

I wanted someone to accept me for me all while refusing to do just that for myself.

Imagine that you have a friend, and every time you see her, she criticizes your appearance. It starts off small like “You should do something different with your hair” or “You really need a pedicure.” As time goes on, it escalates into “Wow, you really need to lose weight!” or “You never seem to have a good hair day, you know that?” Next thing you know, your friend is pointing out every skin blemish, even the tiniest roll or dimple of fat, how your clothes don’t fit you just right, how those lines around your eyes are getting more noticeable, and how no one in their right mind would want to see you naked let alone love you after such a sight.

You wouldn’t remain her friend, would you?

No, of course not. You’d stop returning her calls. Stop hanging out with her and tell all your other friends what a bitch she is. You would be downright pissed at her, and you’d have every right to be. Yet, every day, we say all of those things to ourselves when we look in the mirror. How can you expect to be happy when you are in an abusive relationship with yourself?

I had to stop seeing myself how I thought others saw me. Learning to stand in front of the mirror and admire myself was one of the biggest steps for me. I’d been taught to hate my reflection from early on in life, and it took a lot for me to learn to love the mirror. I started small, by focusing on the good things, and pretty soon, it was difficult for me to see how any of my flaws really made that much of a difference.

I accepted myself. More importantly, I loved myself.

I finally realized that I am worth being happy. I deserve to be happy. And I will continue to make the choices necessary to remain happy. Which means, if there are unhealthy things and/or people around me, I will choose to remove them from my life. I will not grant another person the power to decide whether or not I’m happy.

Which is exactly what I was doing by searching for a relationship to give me my happiness.

I see it everywhere I look; people desperate to find “the one”. I understand, because I’ve been there. I’ve fallen in love too quickly before, simply because I was desperate to have what I thought was missing. I regret giving up so many years of peace because I was too stubborn to take a good, long look at myself.

It’s easy to treat yourself badly. How often do you eat junk food to feel better, or stay up too late because you’re trying to conquer some of that To Do list, or look at yourself with disgust every time you pass a mirror? Do you know the difference between your needs and your desires? How many times have you settled while dating because you’re so lonely and you “need” someone?

Decide that you are no longer going to let your deficiencies define your worth. Look in the mirror and stop the running commentary in your head of how much you hate your body. Replace it with something you like about yourself and add to that list daily. Stop looking for the next relationship to change things and fix the one you’re in with yourself. Attitude and behavior are choices, which means the power to change them lies completely within you. No one else has the power to make your life worth living, so stop giving it to them.

If you want to be happy, then be happy.

*Reprinted with permission from OwningPink.com.
*Visit TheAlphaPussy at Owning Pink.

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