Intrinsic: If You Ever Want to Succeed, Use THIS Kind of Motivation

Intrinsic: If You Ever Want to Succeed, Use THIS Kind of Motivation

“You can motivate by fear. And you can motivate by reward. But both of these methods are only temporary. The only lasting thing is self-motivation.” ~Homer Rice

Ever heard the term “intrinsic motivation” before? Maybe you haven’t, but I’ll bet if you take a moment to read this post, you’ll learn something that can make your life better in just a matter of minutes.

First, let’s define it. According to Psychology today, “intrinsic motivation refers to behavior that is driven by internal rewards. In other words, the motivation to engage in a behavior arises from within the individual because it is intrinsically rewarding. This contrasts with extrinsic motivation, which involves engaging in a behavior in order to earn external rewards or avoid punishments.”

So, in layman’s terms, you’ve got to be motivated to create change because it’s what YOU genuinely want – not because of the fear or excitement of a punishment or reward if you don’t manage to make the desired alterations in your life.

Around here, just understanding the issue isn’t enough – we need to know how to use it to our advantage to improve our lives.

So let’s start here, shall we?

14 Intrinsic Motivation Secrets for Making Everything Better

Scientists, teachers, and business leaders have spent a lot of time trying to find more effective ways to motivate people – and there are thousands of effective (and ineffective methods) to get the job done.

But in almost every situation, one thing is certain and scientists agree: intrinsic motivation works better than external pressure.

Take a look at how to tap into inner sources of inspiration and where to apply them.

How to Use Intrinsic Motivation

  • Ask questions. Ask yourself what you would do if you were not getting paid or receiving any direct compensation. Think about the activities that spark your interest and provide gratification.
  • Set meaningful goals. This line of questioning can help you identify your purpose. With your objectives in mind, you can set priorities and focus on what’s important.
  • Challenge yourself. Aim for targets that are ambitious, without being impossible. Tasks that are too easy tend to become boring. On the other hand, it’s difficult to pursue a dream that seems too far out of reach.
  • Give yourself choices. We all like to feel some sense of control. Build a degree of flexibility into your plans. If you’re trying to practice your French, you may want to watch a foreign movie on the days you get tired of grammar drills.
  • Search for relevance. Even the most tedious tasks become more meaningful if you can relate them to your values. Pulling up weeds in your back yard reinforces your patience.
  • Stimulate your curiosity. Fire yourself up by taking a fresh look at your surroundings. Spend time outdoors appreciating nature. Spend time playing with your children and pets. Ask a librarian to suggest books about a topic you’ve been curious about.
  • Accept impurities. Experts debate whether or not human motivation can be completely intrinsic. Even if you secretly want a little public recognition, it’s still valuable to take pleasure in virtuous actions for their own sake.
  • Limit material rewards. Studies show that external payoffs can make things less appealing, even if we liked doing them in the first place. Delight in supporting a fundraiser for your local animal shelter, regardless of whether you win a raffle prize. While material rewards are nice, the internal reward is what counts.
  • Provide information. Then again, a recent study found that causal information is an effective reward. Boost your motivation by digging up more information about a project. Practical data has the biggest impact.

Where to Apply Intrinsic Motivation in Your Real Life

  • Focus on learning. Many teachers and parents struggle to get kids interested in learning, as opposed to just getting good grades. As an adult, you can attend museum lectures, read classic novels, and conduct your own science experiments without worrying about final exams.
  • Forget about payday. Make a list of the benefits your job provides that go beyond your salary, benefits, and medical insurance plan. Post it somewhere where you can see it, and remind yourself of why you chose your line of work.
  • Get a hobby. Put your leisure time to good use. Pursue your interests and cultivate your creativity. You may discover more about yourself while you’re playing the violin or tending to your vegetable garden.
  • Think about others. Transform your relationships by emphasizing what you can give to others. Be willing to let your mother-in-law win an argument. Switch shifts with a coworker when she needs to take the afternoon off. They’ll be more likely to return the favor.
  • Value yourself. Consider how everything you do contributes to your self-esteem. Choose actions that honor your true worth.

Looking inside yourself for encouragement will make you feel happier and more accomplished. Rely on intrinsic motivation to move ahead in life.

 

Are you living the life your soul intended?

Are you living the life your soul intended?

 Well, are you?

Here are seven sure-fire signs you aren’t living the life your soul intended and what to do about it starting TODAY.

1.You are reading this article. Let’s be honest, when you are out of alignment with your soul purpose, you feel it. Many of your actions are in vain as you continuously feel there is something bigger and better waiting for you. You feel drawn like a moth to a flame to any articles, resources, teachers and books that will shed some much-needed light on that thing that you feel is missing.

2.You spend every waking moment searching for the missing link. Whether you are attending personal development workshops or reading the latest self-help books, you can’t get enough of this material. You are searching high and low for any inkling of what that missing link might be for you and your life. You might even be spending time at work perusing the web in search of your answer. I’ll tell you a secret, the answer you are seeking isn’t on any website, it lies within you.

3.You feel disconnected from life. Your life is good for the most part, but you can’t help but feel disconnected from the passion and excitement that others feel about their work and life in general. The deepest part of you knows it’s possible, but you just aren’t sure where to begin.

4.You are unhappy. From the outside looking in you are living the American dream with a good job, enough money, and maybe even a family, but you just can’t shake the unhappiness that lies just under the surface. You can’t quite put your finger on it, but something feels “off” as you wonder, “Is this it?” You may even feel guilty for having those thoughts because there are so many other people in the world that don’t have what you do. But despite all that, you know you were meant for more.

5.You are playing it safe. At one point you had big dreams and aspirations that made you feel excited and alive, but that was before you decided it was easier to just play it safe and live life by the rules. Rules that told you to go to college, get a good job, save for retirement, take care of your family, and live happily ever after. Only you’re not. You want something more, but are afraid of the uncertainty that lies on the other side of your dreams and every time you begin to think it’s possible, you snap back to reality and recommit yourself to doing what is safe.

6.You are comfortable with the discomfort. While you know you were meant for bigger and better things, you have gotten comfortable with the discomfort because you at least know what to expect. You know that your desires will ebb and flow and that just as you build the courage to do something about your unhappiness, fear creeps in and causes you to retreat back into your normal, logical, live-by-the-rules-life, and the cycle repeats.

7.You are not doing what you love. This is the biggest sign of them all. If you aren’t doing what you love, you aren’t living the life your soul intended. Period.

If you resonate with two or more of the signs above, it’s time you did something about it, starting TODAY. You have gifts to give to the world and when you aren’t living the life your soul-intended, you are withholding the very gifts that will change the world for the better.

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Glass-Inspired Meditation Triggers: Transparency, Reflection, Light

Glass-Inspired Meditation Triggers: Transparency, Reflection, Light

“People are like stained – glass windows. They sparkle and shine when the sun is out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is a light from within.” ~Elisabeth Kubler-Ross

If you think about it, while we don’t really need an excuse to meditate, certain common objects can serve as visual reminders to get and stay focused on what we really want.

Stained_Glass_in_Pink_by_wdwparksgalGlass is part of our everyday life, so that makes it an ideal “meditation trigger.”

It’s used for fine works of art and you see it in ordinary household objects. When you think about it, glass possesses many characteristics that we can use to meditate.

Hold a mirror up to yourself and ponder these 4 qualities.

Meditation on Transparency
One of the first things we notice about glass is that you can see through it. Imagine how your life would be different without anything to cover up. Keeping secrets can cause anxiety and drain us of our energy. Many people talk about the virtues of transparency, but it takes courage to fully reveal ourselves.

  • Think about your secrets. List the things you keep covered up. Maybe you’re reluctant to let others know your weaknesses or there’s an event from your past you keep hidden.
  • Examine your motives. There are good reasons to keep some information confidential, like when you’re trying to protect someone’s privacy. On the other hand, you may be ignoring something you’d be better off discussing with someone.
  • Imagine being more open. Picture yourself revealing more. Ask yourself if having fewer secrets would make you feel more at ease.
  • Unveil yourself. Get one thing off your chest. Tell someone your correct age or let a coworker know that you need help to meet a deadline.

Meditation on Reflections
A mirror reflects whatever appears before it. To some extent, we’re all products of our environment.

Contemplate your surroundings. Describe the settings where you spend the majority of your time. Form an image of your home and workplace. Or maybe you spend long hours in your car.

Assess your feelings. Connect with how your environment influences your emotions. Discover when you feel relaxed and when you tense up.

Focus on factors that make you feel good. Figure out what settings work best for you. Maybe you thrive on peace and quiet or perhaps you like a lot of background activity.

Redecorate one area. Take what you learn and make one spot more comfortable for yourself. Put a vase of flowers on your desk at the office or clear the clutter out of the back seat of your car.

Meditation on Light
Shining light on glass brings out its beauty. You see its full color and translucency. In the same way, a cheerful attitude makes us feel sunnier and more attractive.

  • Laugh a little. Spend a few moments laughing. It’s okay if it’s artificial at first. It will soon become an authentic experience.
  • Savor the feeling. Enjoy the physical and mental sensations. Notice how your heart rate increases and your face flushes. Appreciate how your stress level decreases and you feel more relaxed.
  • Share your joy. Invite others to participate in your glee. Spend time playing with your children or throw a costume party.

Meditation on Cleanliness
A glass window looks dramatically different after it’s been cleaned. When you remove the surface grime, the whole room brightens up. Our minds often need to be “polished” as well.

  • Observe your thoughts. Review what’s on your mind. Are you still replaying the traffic jams you encountered during your morning commute or are you giving your undivided attention to your work?
  • Identify impurities. Recognize which of your thoughts are dragging you down. You may be telling yourself that your thighs are too big or wishing it would stop raining.
  • Generate positive thoughts. Transform your way of looking at things. Congratulate yourself for trying to lose weight or think of how good the rain is for your garden.

Let glass inspire you how to lead a happier and more meaningful life. Let in more light and gain wisdom through meditation and reflection.

Think your phone can replace your FitBit? Here’s why you’re wrong.

Think your phone can replace your FitBit? Here’s why you’re wrong.

So a new study says that your phone is equally effective for counting your steps as a FitBit or other wearable fitness tracking technology. (Linked below)

There is of course a big flaw in that study, and that is that most people do put their phones down sometimes.

For me, the FiTBit also serves as a visual reminder – not only to my own desire to stay on track with diet and exercise, but also of the people I’m always competing against.

But those people, they live in the FitBit app on my phone, inside my challenge groups and friends. And just about the time I start to think I’m so much ahead on those steps, I will see someone blast ahead of me and past me.

So then I’ll get up and move again, getting in those steps that keep me competitive in a game that matters to no one and to which the prize is your own health.

It’s simple: FitBit is better than a phone alone because you can wear it almost all the time and because it auto tracks you even without your phone. What do you think?

02/11/2015 By Craig Lloyd

One of the biggest advantages of having a smartwatch is for the fitness-tracking capabilities, but according to a new study, your smartphone is actually better at tracking your fitness activities.

A new paper that was recently published in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that most fitness-focused smartphone apps are just as accurate (sometimes more so) than many wearable fitness trackers.

To find this out, researchers at thePerelman School of Medicine and the Center for Health Incentives and Behavioral Economics at the University of Pennsylvaniagathered up 14 participants and had them walk on a treadmill for two 500-1,500 step sessions. During that time, the participants wore various fitness tracking devices to track their steps. These includedthree waistband tracking devices, three fitness smartwatches and two smartphones running four different fitness apps each (the phones were placed in the participants’ pants pockets.

The devices in question? AGalaxy S4, iPhone 5s, Nike Fuelband, Jawbone UP24,Digi-Walker SW-200, Fitbit Flex, Fitbit One and the Fitbit Zip.

The researchers found that the two smartphones had a margin of error of 12.9%, and the margin of error for the various fitness wearables ranged up to 22.7%, with the Nike Fuelband having the worst 

Lead study author Meredith A. Case says:

In this study, we wanted to address one of the challenges with using wearable devices: they must be accurate. After all, if a device is going to be effective at monitoring and potentially changing behavior, individuals have to be able to trust the data…We found that smartphone apps are just as accurate as wearable devices for tracking physical activity.”

 

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