The Insecure Narcissist: Example

The Insecure Narcissist: Example


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When Insecurity Looks Like Extreme Confidence: A Narcissistic Example

When I was just starting my business, I decided I needed to do local networking. I’d heard it would be good for the business, so I did some digging and started looking at small business groups on meetup.com.

The Idealization

I felt so lucky when I quickly found a local small business meetup that was happening just a short distance from my house.

At the first meeting, we were each invited to briefly introduce ourselves and explain our business. When it was my turn, one woman looked up sharply like she’d been stung by a bee as I started to talk about my business.

She caught my eye as I spoke, and I smiled at her. At first, she just stared, but then I saw a small smile form on her face. I felt relieved and went on.

After the introductions, we had lunch. I went over to say hello to the woman, and she seemed really friendly.

The Facade is Cast

She was a gorgeous, charming, and seemingly very successful woman. She seemed to be someone I could really learn a lot from.

She said she’d been in business for years (though in hindsight, I realize that she didn’t really explain her business when given the chance and was pretty vague about it). Still, she seemed quite successful.

She talked the big talk. And as far as I could tell, she was walking the big walk.

She drove an expensive car, had an expensive bag, and had those expensive shoes with red soles. You know the ones I mean. And her jewelry! I could tell it was all real – a stark contrast to my costume knockoffs.

I was on the hunt for a mentor, and she seemed like a perfect fit! She was confident, attractive and seemed quite intelligent.

The Private Meeting On the Pedestal

She asked me a lot of questions about my business and offered little snippets of advice that seemed legit. At the end of the meeting, she invited me to meet her for lunch the following week.

The day we met for lunch, she asked for more details about my business, which I happily shared. Then, much to my delight, she was telling me all about her upcoming executive board meeting.

She said they were considering investing in other local small businesses and that if I played my cards right, they might invest in mine.

Of course, I was over the moon! I practically worshipped her – I wanted to BE her!

It was a lot like when I almost interviewed Sam Vaknin, but she was more covert than he was in her narcissism. She came to me as a would-be mentor, and I ate it up like so much cake.

And since the lady promised to bring me up at this meeting, I started pulling together all sorts of documentation and information about my business.

Being Ghosted

The next day, I emailed the information as she had asked, and I waited for her to get back to me after her meeting. But then she went silent. I was a little sad but figured maybe my business just wasn’t up to snuff for this executive board.

She had literally ghosted me.

I understood – after all, I had just started my business and wasn’t super successful yet.

And there was a stark contrast between my business and hers – she, at that time, was clearly well beyond me, it seemed.

I counted myself lucky for our time together and moved on.

I mean, she had an EXECUTIVE BOARD. All I had at the time was me. 

The Shocking Truth

Then, a couple of months later, I noticed that she’d created a brand new Facebook page. It seemed she had just launched a new business – and when I started looking into it, it turned out that her business was eerily familiar.

In fact, it was like she literally copied the business plan and structure that I had outlined for her months ago.

I was shocked and angry. I was confused.

The Direct Discard

I reached out to her and asked what she was doing. She told me that I was mistaken, that it had been her idea the whole time. 

She said that the business plan I had submitted to her was a joke, and THAT was why she’d gone silent. In hindsight, I realize that was straight-up gaslighting.

She subtly tore me down, implying that I was stupid to think that someone like HER could possibly take an idea from someone as small potatoes as ME.

Of course, when I pointed out that she had literally done everything I’d put in the business plan, she got offended and screamed at me, telling me she was tired of people always accusing her of stuff like this.

She called me jealous and immediately blocked me.  I had been officially discarded.

Then, from what I heard, she started talking to our few mutual connections about how I thought I owned my niche and how she practically invented me anyway. (Sounds a  lot like a smear campaign, no?)

It went on from there.

Lessons Learned

What I missed was that her apparent confidence was more like grandiosity.

I missed that she had used me to get an idea for a short-lived business.

I missed that this was a pattern with her.

I missed that she only liked me while I was actively worshipping her, and I didn’t expect her to attack me the way she did.

I missed all the red flags.

The Pattern of Abuse in Toxic Relationships

Later, I would learn that I wasn’t the only person she had done this to – apparently, several people who had been part of the group at different times had experienced the same thing.

I learned that her fancy bag, car, and shoes were thanks to her wealthy husband.

And she was a bored stay-at-home wife (no kids) with too much time on her hands. And as for her stealing all of my business? I admit I worried for a minute.

After all, she had a lot more money than I did and, as far as I could tell, would be far more successful than I could.

But I didn’t have to worry for long because after failing to become immediately successful, she moved on to someone else’s idea. (Plus, if we’re being honest, she was trying to be someone she just wasn’t.)

Was she a narcissist? I don’t know. But she certainly behaved like one in certain ways. Learn more about narcissists and their insecurity in this post.

Start Getting Help with Narcissistic Abuse Recovery Today

Shadow Work for Narcissistic Abuse Survivors

Shadow Work for Narcissistic Abuse Survivors

 “Shadow work is, at heart, about developing self-awareness and ultimately, self-acceptance and compassion. Shadow work is often both therapy and more spiritual, helping you see the different parts of yourself.” ~Maggie Wooll

Advanced Self-Help Healing: Shadow Work in Narcissistic Abuse Recovery

If you’ve found yourself dealing with narcissistic abuse in a toxic relationship, chances are you’ve found yourself feeling lost, unseen, unheard, and even completely invisible. You might not be sure who you are anymore.

While nearly everyone could benefit from shadow work, for narcissistic abuse survivors, not only is it something that could temporarily soothe some of the pain you’re dealing with, but the long-term application could change everything for you.

For survivors, going this deep can be far more difficult and painful than most people realize. I can relate because I’ve been there myself

Narcissists are so good at manipulating us and keeping us under their thumbs that we are often left feeling like a hopeless mess, with no sense of who we are or what we want. Shadow work may offer exactly the help you’ve been looking for if you’ve found yourself in this situation.

This is just one reason why shadow work is so important for narcissistic abuse survivors.

How can you do shadow work on your own?

Good news – shadow work is one way you can “self-help” your way through recovery. In fact, I recently launched a new series to teach you about shadow work in bite-sized pieces.

Want to participate? It’s free – just follow this playlist to learn about and get prompts nearly every day through my new shadow work series. You’ll also be able to access it through this website. 

 

Who created shadow work?

Carl Jung, a psychologist from Switzerland, is reportedly the first person who conceived of the idea of the shadow self. In Jungian psychology, the word ‘shadow’ refers to hidden parts of our being. 

Jung described it as the “unknown dark side of the personality” that was “instinctive and irrational.”

“There is no coming to consciousness without pain,” Jung said. “People will do anything, no matter how absurd, in order to avoid facing their own soul. One does not become enlightened by imagining figures of light, but by making the darkness conscious.”

He also noted that the shadow is prone to psychological projection. This, he said, would lead to perceived personal inferiority within yourself, just as you might notice that someone else has some sort of perceived moral deficiency.

What is Shadow Work?

“The shadow is a moral problem that challenges the whole ego-personality, for no one can become conscious of the shadow without considerable moral effort. To become conscious of it involves recognizing the dark aspects of the personality as present and real. This act is the essential condition for any kind of self-knowledge.” ~Carl Jung, Aion (1951)

Shadow work is a term used to describe the process of facing your own darkness.  It’s meant to help you find and fix the “broken” parts of yourself. In other words, shadow work will help you to identify the parts of yourself that you are afraid to look at, either because they are taboo or because they might not be so nice (or because you might feel embarrassed or shy to share them with anyone else – sometimes, you’re even hiding from yourself).

Shadow work is about facing your inner darkness head-on and finding a way to heal from narcissistic abuse and trauma

Shadow work reconnects us with our spiritual selves, helps us find the parts of ourselves that have been broken and damaged (and even little habits we just don’t love about ourselves), then guides us on the path to personal growth and empowerment.

How do you know you need to do shadow work?

When I first learned about shadow work, I thought I’d already healed from all of my damage and had nothing left to fix – at least nothing much. But sure enough, I still had plenty of deep-rooted issues – and it really helped me to clear my head, my heart, and my mind so I could evolve into the next best self I could be.

Often we don’t realize that these things exist within us until someone else points them out to us through their behavior toward us (or sometimes even just by using language like “you’re not good enough”).

When we hear something like this from another person (in whatever form), it feels like confirmation of all the things we may already know about ourselves but that we haven’t been able to face before now – so instead we project those thoughts onto other people instead.

Now, there’s another thing to think about: if you’re anything like me, your first instinct when you started noticing these things was to just shove it down and stop the behavior rather than going to the trouble to work through it and move forward in a healthier way. 

What’s the difference between inner child work and shadow work?

If you’re wondering what’s different between inner child work and shadow work (or even the difference between inner child and shadow self, know that you’re not alone. When I began to research shadow work, I suspected they were either connected or were one and the same. 

And, according to my research, they are indeed connected. The way I understand it, shadow work encompasses more than the inner child, but does include the inner child. 

So, in layman’s terms, the inner child will be healed as one part of the shadow work, but the shadow encompasses your whole life up to this point, along with all of the latest traumas.

When you grew out of being a child, your inner child stayed stuck – but your shadow continued along the way with you and saw the rest of the stress and mess you experienced. 

How is Shadow Work Used by Narcissistic Abuse Survivors?

Shadow Work can be used as a sort of “self-help therapy” when you’re going through narcissistic abuse recovery.

Many narcissistic abuse survivors report that doing shadow work has helped them to reclaim their identity and find their true self-worth again after being manipulated and controlled throughout their relationship with a narcissist.

Shadow work involves looking at aspects of your personality that aren’t healthy or positive, so they can be brought to the light and resolved through positive action steps like journaling or meditating on them until they resolve themselves internally.

Shadow work can also help survivors deal with painful memories related to the abuse cycle itself (i.e., flashbacks).

This process is often difficult for people who’ve experienced narcissistic abuse because they’re triggered regularly by things like social media posts or news articles about similar situations happening around us today.

At what point in narcissistic abuse recovery is shadow work most effective?

When you’re ready to do your shadow work, you’ll need to be beyond the first stage of recovery if you’re going to be effective and not retraumatize yourself too much. Why? 

At the beginning of recovery, you might find yourself sort of spinning and feeling very raw. In this state, you’re not going to be very effective with shadow work, due to both your own fragile state and the fact that you’re going to be trying to figure out the narcissist and their own psychology at this point.

That’s exactly why I believe that shadow work will work best for survivors who are in the last stages of healing and evolving after abuse.

As we muddle through the early steps of recovery when we’re often feeling like it’s painful to even be awake, much less digging into ourselves to find the hidden broken parts.

We’re just not there yet; we’re not really ready or even equipped to do our shadow work as we suffer through the early stages of recovery. 

But by the time you’ve gotten past the first few hurdles in recovery, you might be looking for a deeper or more advanced way to work through your traumas and finally, release them – once and for all. Shadow work might be just what you need.

How do you know where you’re at? Take the DUO test and find out.

How to Start the Shadow Work Process

You’ve just taken the first step in this process by reading the information above. Now, it can help to understand why you need to do this work and how it will help you heal from narcissistic abuse in ways that other healing modalities can’t.

5 Steps For Doing Shadow Work

You might feel like you’re beating your head against a wall, but you will get there. We will be using a modified version of my DUO Method to do our shadow work together.

Here are the steps we’ll follow doing our shadow work. 

  • Step 1: Identify the problem. What do you want to work through or fix in yourself? (Discover)
  • Step 2: Acknowledge the problem and accept it. Accept without condition both the problem and yourself in the process – you’re not bad or evil because you’ve struggled with this or any other issue. (Unconditional self-acceptance)
  • Step 3: Look at the problem (this is where you have to dig deep) and do your research to understand it. (Understand)
  • .Step 4:  Be honest with yourself about what’s been going on, who’s been involved, and how this has impacted your life in a negative way for years now, even when it was just one or two small things happening every once in a while that added up over time until all of a sudden everything changed overnight…because it usually does! (Overcome)
  • Step 5: Unconditionally accept and learn to love you for YOU. This is where evolution happens for a survivor. 

Shadow Work Prompts for Narcissistic Abuse Survivors

One of the simplest and most effective ways to start your shadow work is through journal prompts. You’ll want to get a dedicated notebook or to even use YouTube, Instagram, or TikTok to record yourself and your efforts in mind and to keep your thoughts in place and organized. 

I’ve recently launched a new series for narcissistic abuse survivors on my video platforms. Here’s the first video for your convenience. (I’m using the hashtag #shadowworkforsurviors on all platforms – so feel free to follow wherever you prefer. I’m on YouTube, TikTok, IG and Facebook Reels)

If you want to get a jump start on this process, you can start by taking some time to answer each of the following questions in your journal or video diary. 

  • How can I feel safe in this world?
  • What is my worth, and how am I going to get it back?
  • How do I trust people again, or do I even have the capacity to trust people again?
  • What are some of the ways that I have been damaged by being in a relationship with someone who was toxic like this one was?
  • How do I express my emotions now that they’re no longer being oppressed by my abuser’s behavior?

There are simple ways to begin doing shadow work, but it takes a long time and can be painful. In any case, it’s totally worth the effort. You can do it!

Takeaway 

  • Healthy relationships are a challenge for anyone, especially those of us who have been through narcissistic abuse. However, by doing shadow work, you can heal your past trauma and find the confidence to move forward with your life.
  • Shadow work can be used as part of the process of healing after narcissistic abuse. The idea behind it is that when you have been in an abusive relationship, you have become confused about who you are and what is real. Shadow work offers the opportunity to rediscover yourself and redesign your life.
  • Your abuser has controlled your reality by gradually changing how you think, how you feel, and what makes sense to you. As part of this process, they may also have convinced you that there are parts of yourself that are negative or bad.
  • It can be helpful to think about shadow work as a process of facing the parts of ourselves that we have been avoiding (the shadow). This might include our pain, our feelings about being controlled or manipulated by others, or even just our own feelings about ourselves.

Start Getting Help with Narcissistic Abuse Recovery Today

Brain Fog from Toxic Relationships: The Science and Ways You Can Help Yourself

Brain Fog from Toxic Relationships: The Science and Ways You Can Help Yourself

You are still reeling from your experiences during narcissistic abuse in a toxic relationship.

And who could blame you?

After all, you’ve lost your sense of who you are and of what reality is all about. It’s not that you’ve lost your intelligence or your personality – it’s just that it feels kind of disjointed or disconnected from the person you are today.

Something you may not remember right now is that MOST people you meet actually really enjoy your company.

They like you as a person, and they value your contributions. You’re great at conversation and even better at making people feel worthy and seen.

That is what the narcissist has hidden from you, and it’s why you’re feeling so foggy and lost, at least in part.

Understanding Brain Fog and C-PTSD in Narcissistic Abuse Recovery

Brain fog is common for survivors of circumstances when a loved one- especially a parent-was dealing with untreated mental illness.

How can your brain feel so foggy after a relationship with a toxic person? Brain fog is a difficult and confusing experience to live through, and it is one that is poorly understood by most people.

It’s a common problem, yet one that many don’t talk about…much less understand. It’s called brain fog. This video offers a comprehensive look into narcissistic abuse and its effects on your brain – and more. 

What is brain fog?

Brain Fog is, to put it simply, the feeling of dissociation or disconnectedness often experienced during and after narcissistic abuse. It’s a symptom of C-PTSD. It is what’s happening when you’re feeling lost, like you’re not really there, or like you’re watching your life through a screen or a bubble. You might also feel stuck and unable to function like you normally would.

How can you tell you’re dealing with brain fog?

Brain fog presents itself in different ways for different people. Some feel just stuck and unable to function.

Others feel like they’re watching their lives through a movie screen or like they’re in some kind of bubble that makes them feel like they’re not really here, or like they’re separated from everyone else.

What are the effects of brain fog after narcissistic abuse?

Along with the brain fog effects listed here, there are many other issues and concerns for those of us who have or have had struggles with brain fog.

But ultimately, when you realize that you have been gaslighted for many years and wonder why your health problems are getting worse, or why you are experiencing brain fog, that is because of the trauma from the abuse. (If you think you’re being gaslighted but you’re not sure, take this free gaslighting self-assessment).

Childhood trauma and toxic families lead to C-PTSD.

Brain fog, depression, and anxiety are just a few of the mental health issues associated with C-PTSD. These symptoms are caused by childhood trauma, abuse, and neglect. Learn more about C-PTSD.

There is hope… even if you have severe brain fog and other illnesses related to the disorder. (If you think you’ve got C-PTSD, take this free C-PTSD self-assessment and find out).

  • The brain fog that many of us experience after a narcissistic relationship is one of the many symptoms of CPTSD. Brain fog is an impairment in a person’s ability to process information, think clearly, and make good decisions.
  • You may feel like you’re in a mental fog or daze most days or have difficulty remembering what you were just thinking about. This can go hand-in-hand with the memory problems experienced with PTSD, especially if the abuse you experienced was not physical but psychological.

Want to learn more about brain fog and narcissistic abuse recovery?

Go watch this video, which offers a comprehensive look into narcissistic abuse and its effects on your brain – and more.  Or, look at any of the rest of my videos or check out the blog here to read more about recovering from a toxic relationship with a narcissist and to get self-help tips for recovering from C-PTSD and brain fog.

Start Getting Help with Narcissistic Abuse Recovery Today

*Disclaimer – Please note: First and foremost, If you think you may be experiencing these symptoms, you should see a doctor. The last thing anyone wants is to end up misdiagnosed and treated for something that’s not impacting their health. ALWAYS be sure to check in with a doctor first, do your research, and talk to other people before making any decisions about your treatment options.

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