Top 5 Protein Myths That Hurt Your Diet

Top 5 Protein Myths That Hurt Your Diet

You know that you need protein to have a healthy diet and body. However, there are some myths about protein that can confuse you and lead you down the wrong path. Not everything you hear about protein is true.

Protein is an essential nutrient for your entire body.

Beware of falling for these protein myths:

1. Myth 1: Protein magically builds muscle. One common myth revolves around eating protein such as peanut butter, meat or other foods and magically getting big or strong muscles.

  •  Unfortunately, simply eating protein isn’t going to make you bulk up overnight. If you don’t exercise, the protein you eat won’t turn into muscle. You have to exercise regularly in addition to eating protein to see results.

2. Myth 2: All protein is the same. Protein gets broken down into amino acids in your body. Does it really matter if it’s coming from a candy bar with nuts or a protein shake,

  • The truth is that the source of the protein does matter.
  • For example, animal and plant sources of protein aren’t identical. The main difference is that many plant sources don’t have all the essential amino acids your body requires. In addition, it’s harder for your body to extract some of the protein from plant sources.

3. Myth 3: You can’t overeat protein. This myth focuses on falsely believing that you can eat as much protein as you want without any consequences.

  • You hear many warnings about eating too many carbohydrates and fats. However, how often do you hear warnings about eating too much protein, On the contrary, many believe you can’t overindulge in protein. This is simply not true, and there are consequences to eating too much protein.
  •  Some of the common issues surrounding too much protein consumption include weight gain. Extra protein can turn into fat that is stored in the body. In addition, overeating protein can cause kidney damage and bad breath.

4. Myth 4: You must eat protein after every workout. You may be tempted to eat protein after workouts because of this myth. The idea behind the myth is that you need protein to rebuild the muscles you’re using.

  • The protein can refuel your body after a long day at the gym. However, if you forget to eat it or simply don’t want to eat it, then it’s not an issue.
  • Research shows that having a large amount of protein right after a workout doesn’t offer any long-term benefits. As long as you’re getting enough protein from your meals and other snacks during the day, you don’t have to rush to eat more protein right after running for a mile.

5. Myth 5: Protein will help you lose weight. Protein can be part of a weight loss plan, but eating it alone won’t be enough to lose weight.

  • For example, if you dramatically increase the amount of protein you eat, but don’t exercise or change other habits, then you may not lose any weight.
  • Protein isn’t a magic pill that will melt pounds away the minute you increase your protein consumption. It’s still important to control your calories, work out, and eat healthier.

Protein is a crucial nutrient, but it’s important to avoid falling for these myths. For your best results, maintain a healthy, balanced diet with many types of nutrients and exercise to stay fit.

Say Goodbye to Heel Pain

Say Goodbye to Heel Pain

Heel pain that comes and goes may seem mysterious, but it’s all too common. According to The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about one million patients go to see their doctor each year to treat plantar fasciitis, the most common cause of this symptom.

In case you’re not already familiar with your plantar fascia, it’s the tissue that supports the arch of your foot. When it’s overstretched, it can make walking or standing difficult. Usually, you’ll notice your first twinge when you plant your feet on the floor in the morning. The sensation may go away after a few steps, but the relief is short-lived.

Left untreated, the effects of plantar fasciitis will spread. However, more than 90% of cases can be solved with simple in-home treatments. Use these tips to find lasting relief.

Preventing Heel Pain

1. Lose weight. While walking is a great way to lose excess pounds, that extra weight can be hard on your feet. The majority of patients with plantar fasciitis are obese. While you’re slimming down, ask your doctor about which preventive measures are suitable for you.

2. Change your shoes. Look for styles with firm heel counters and substantial arch support. Check your footwear regularly for signs of wear. A good rule of thumb is to replace walking shoes at least every 300 miles.

3. Stretch your feet and calves. Tight calves and Achilles tendons put strain on your feet as they try to compensate by overdoing their natural rolling motion. Perform stretches that target your calves, as well as your ankles and toes. For example, stand on the edge of the stairs, and lower yourself up and down.

4. Cushion the floor. Do you spend a lot of time standing on hard floors? A pad or rug in your kitchen or in your workplace could help.

5. Rest up. If possible, stop or limit the activities that make your heels hurt. They need a break so they can recover.

6. Vary your workouts. You may still be able to exercise if you change your routine. Go for a swim or ride a stationary bike instead of taking your usual run. Ease back into your former activities gradually to sustain your recovery.

Treating heel pain

1. Ask your doctor. Arthritis and ligament tears can cause heel pain too. Your doctor will check your history and X-ray your feet to diagnose your condition.

2. Be patient. If your feet have been under stress for a long time, they’ll take a while to recover. While patients often experience some relief quickly, it may take up to a year to see the full results.

3. Apply ice. Cooling your heels can reduce inflammation and pain. You may also want to try contrast baths, alternating between hot water and ice, and finishing up with ice.

4. Take medication. For fast aid, take a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug like ibuprofen or naproxen. If your symptoms still persist after several weeks, your doctor may recommend corticosteroid shots.

5. Wear a splint. Night splints that stretch your feet and Achilles tendon overnight are extremely effective. Many studies show they even work for patients whose symptoms are long-standing.

6. See a specialist. If you need further assistance, your doctor may refer you to an orthopedist or podiatrist. You may also want to consult a sports medicine professional who can evaluate whether running or other activities are affecting your condition.

The sooner you start treating plantar fasciitis, the easier it will be to heal your heels. Protect your comfort and mobility by wearing supportive shoes, stretching regularly, and modifying your activities if you notice pain in your heels.

Doctors Share Their Real Weight Loss Secrets

Doctors Share Their Real Weight Loss Secrets

Have you ever wondered how doctors really lose weight? Although not all medical professionals are slim, some seem to have discovered weight loss secrets that could help you.

Doctors often fight their own weight loss battles, so they’ve learned how to keep the pounds off and away. You can learn from their secrets and use them to lose weight too.

Try these effective techniques:

1. Avoid watching the scale. Doctors admit that they don’t pay attention to the bathroom scale. Instead of watching every pound they gain or lose, they share that they focus on how they feel, and how their clothes fit.

  • * It’s more pleasing to watch your jeans or pants fit you better than to obsess about the numbers on the scale. Your weight will naturally fluctuate on a daily basis. This is mostly due to water retention, so it’s important to focus more on the big picture.

2. They count calories where it matters. Instead of calculating the calories in each piece of lettuce, most doctors pay attention to calories where they matter.

  • * For example, they don’t worry about calories in fruits and vegetables because these foods have fiber and other nutrients that strengthen your health.
  • * However, they pay close attention to the calories in snacks such as granola or trail mix. You may be surprised to learn how many empty calories are in some of your favorite snack foods. They may look healthy, but in reality, they pack in the calories.

3. They pay attention to diet supplements. Sometimes, even doctors consider magic pills like diet supplements.

  • * What separates doctors from most consumers is that they carefully study the ingredients before they take any supplement. They understand that some of the ingredients can have serious side effects in addition to weight loss.
  • * They also check with other professionals if they need more information.

4. They avoid letting diet failures stop them. Doctors sometimes cheat and fail at their diets. After all, they are human. Failures will happen, but the way you respond to them matters. Doctors understand that they can start a diet again without issues.

  • * Many doctors admit that some of their diets haven’t worked in the past. Nevertheless, they’re always ready to start again and keep going to reach their weight loss goals.

5. They understand stress eating. Their jobs are filled with stress, so they know that stress eating is a reality. However, they also know that when you eat because of stress, you can seriously damage your weight loss efforts.

  • * Doctors have stressful jobs that often involve overtime and worrying about their patients. They also have to deal with late payments from patients, insurance companies, pharmaceutical reps, difficult staff members, and huge medical school loans.
  • * They’ve figured out other coping mechanisms to deal with the worry and anxiety that don’t involve food. One of the best ways to stop stress eating is to exercise or get active. Dancing, running, walking, or hiking can help you fight stress without adding extra calories to your day or night.

Doctors know that weight loss is a long-term goal and not a short-term fight. You don’t have to invest in complicated programs to achieve long-term results. You can use slimming secrets from doctors to keep the pounds away and stay lean.

Narcissistic Abuse Recovery: Eliminating Your ‘Roadblocks’

Narcissistic Abuse Recovery: Eliminating Your ‘Roadblocks’

While no two people are the same, we all have one thing in common – the little “roadblocks” that get in our way as we try to figure out what we really want from life.

Overcoming fear to leave a narcissistic relationship

Roadblocks stop some people from ever making a change, but they motivate others to keep on going to find a way to what they want, regardless of the roadblock.

You might have one of these roadblocks or you might experience more than one of them – and if you’re involved with a narcissist, chances are that you experience them on a regular basis.

Fear Itself: A Common Roadblock

One of the most common roadblocks to creating personal change and beginning to create a new, healthier life for yourself is fear. When things change, it ushers in differences that can make us afraid.

When it comes to leaving the narcissist and beginning to recover from the abuse you suffered in your relationship, fear of being alone, fear of financial ruin and fear of change are all common roadblocks we deal with as we consider our options.

FEAR: False Evidence Appearing Real.

Your fears are usually based on what if myths – and they almost always never come to pass. Don’t let fear cause you to sit on the sidelines of change.

Another roadblock that gets in the way is a lack of knowledge.

It’s hard to make changes when you’re not sure exactly how to go about those changes. You might be branching out into an area that’s completely beyond your scope of knowledge at the present time.

Remember that what you don’t know can be learned. Use educational resources as your catalyst for change and success. Strive for new levels of insight that you previously didn’t have.

Do NOT Settle for Good Enough

Thinking that you simply can’t add another thing to your already full life keeps many people stuck where they are. Making changes requires work. So many people see the effort as not worth the payoff – and that’s a mistake.

This belief is what keeps you rooted to that job that you hate, to those messy finances, or to that relationship that’s sucking the life right out of you. Learning better time management skills can be a catalyst for a better life as you clear out things that are a waste of time and make room for what offers the most benefits.

Don’t Stagnate: Happy ‘Enough’ Can Become ‘Truly’ Happy

Being just comfortable enough where you are can be a roadblock to motivate you to change. You’re not 100% happy, but you’re “happy enough.” All this means is that you settled for a life that keeps you locked in your comfort zone.

You’re trading a full life for one that’s half empty – because if you’re not 100% satisfied, then something is missing. That something may be the very thing that you always wanted, but because you were “happy enough,” you’ll never reach it.

Visualization can be a catalyst for the changes you need to make.

Picture the next level of success in every area of your life – finances, career satisfaction, relationships, health – everything that matters most to you.

Focus on how it could be improved and then make a game plan to get you there. If you block out those thoughts in an effort to stay content, you’ll never know what you could have made out of your life if you’d give it a chance.

Wanting everything to be perfect is a huge roadblock to motivation. It’s here where people stall out. They want the new situation to be perfect before they attempt any changes.

They want the new job to have everything in place. They don’t want to take the chance that they’ll make a switch and find it’s not what they wanted. These are people who wait for the “perfect” relationship before getting into one.

Perfectionism is the killer of change because what you see in your mind as perfection doesn’t translate that way in life. That’s because there are no perfect scenarios in a life that’s lived to the fullest.

There are experiences to encounter – and not one of them will be perfect. That’s okay. Perfectionism kills progress. You don’t want to be sitting on the sidelines waiting to get into the game of life.

The number one roadblock that keeps too many people from letting a catalyst be their motivation is the fear of failure. They falsely believe that they haven’t failed yet because they haven’t even tried – so they’re safe.

But whether they realize it or not, they have failed. They’re choosing to stay stagnant in a lesser life than what they dreamed of. That, in itself, is a form of failure.

Another roadblock happens when people wait for change rather than seeking change. They wait for the perfect joint venture partner to come to them instead of seeking one out, because that requires putting themselves on the line.

They wait to see if the person they’re in a relationship with is going to treat them better, rather than speaking up about what they want and deserve. They avoid tough situations and tough conversations because they’re waiting for everything to work out on its own.

Change isn’t something that happens on a whim. It’s something that you make happen. You have to find the motivation within yourself to make that change. And it’s uncomfortable at first.

That’s okay. Take that sign of discomfort as a compliment. It’s proving to you that you’re taking action and bettering your life, even in the face of fear or uneasiness.

Your Mind Can Be a Catalyst
    
You get the life that you think you deserve. Your mind or your thought patterns lead you to make changes – to take action that alters the life you currently have. What usually happens when someone’s mind leads them to take action is they become so upset with their current situation, they think leaving it where it’s at is no longer an option.

Their emotions will often reach a point that they must make a change. This drive can often start out backed by an emotion. For example, if someone is in a relationship with a person who didn’t treat them that well, they’ll often stick with the relationship until a catalyst fueled by emotion causes a change.

One emotion could be anger. If the person you’re in a relationship with is unfaithful, it’s often anger over the cheating that drives the catalyst – even when the prior bad behavior didn’t induce a change.

Your subconscious knows what you truly want. What happens is this true desire becomes buried deep under what we’re willing to settle for. This is why so many people aren’t living a life full of passion.

You can tell if you’re living a life full of passion by asking yourself this question. Do I love getting out of bed in the morning? If you’re not excited about what you get to do when you get out of bed, that’s a warning sign that you need to find your catalyst.

Whatever it is that motivates you is what will drive you to wake up, ready to start and excel throughout your day. It will drive you to keep going in the face of obstacles.

You’ll continue on – even if you’re the only one who believes in you, or your idea or your change. That’s why it’s vital to your success – to your ability to thrive – that you get in a business that you have a strong emotional attachment to – something you are proud of and believe in strongly.

Face the Hard Truth About What’s Keeping You Stuck: Taking Personal Responsibility for Your Life

Did you ever hear of someone who had a terrible health scare because they made bad choices in life that led to the issue? It shook them up – and for awhile, they strictly followed the doctor’s orders.

They ate right. They exercised. They got the amount of sleep that they needed. They quit smoking. They quit drinking. Yet before several months were out, they slipped right back into their old habits.

The catalyst, which was the health scare, came face to face with personal responsibility – and lost. The hard truth is that in order for your catalyst to motivate you, you’re going to have to accept personal responsibility.

The choices that you make in life are your choices. You made them because you thought they were the best option at the time. You might have received bad advice that led you to a decision – but in the end, you were the one that made that choice.

Take Responsibility for Your Life as It Stands, Then Move Forward Being Intentionally Responsible

You have to accept personal responsibility for what you want to see changed in your life before it can change. People who place the blame on others for their lot in life don’t ever reach a place where they’re truly happy – regardless of the changes.

That’s because they see life as happening to them rather than them making life happen. Accept the responsibility for your mistakes, for your poor choices, for that awful job you shouldn’t have taken, or for that relationship that was a mess from the start that you wasted too much time on.

Once you accept it, you can move on. You can free yourself to finally accept the catalyst for change. Don’t let where you were be a stone around your neck that anchors you to the place where you currently are.

Let the mistakes you made in the past become part of your motivation – part of your growing experience. While growth is hard, all good things happen with the evolution to a different place in life.

What do you think? Share your thoughts in the comments section.

Boundary-Busting Narcissist? Here’s a Non-Toxic Boundary-Management Plan

Boundary-Busting Narcissist? Here’s a Non-Toxic Boundary-Management Plan

One of the most difficult aspects of being tangled in a narcissist’s web is learning to set firm boundaries with them. Narcissists typically have poor boundaries themselves; they like to win and maintain power, and they don’t like others setting boundaries on them. They even feel above the boundaries of the law — they don’t follow court orders and they find personal boundaries easy to violate.” ~Karyl McBride, MDHow to stop a boundary busting narcissist

If you’re in a relationship with a toxic narcissist, or have ever been in one, you might have a few boundary issues, am I right?

Have you ever thought about the boundaries you had for yourself and your life before you met the narcissist versus the ones you have now, or that you had during the relationship?

Wait. Before you answer that, let me clarify something.

I’m not talking about the fun or silly “I’ll never wear bell bottoms” kind of boundary here (had it, crossed it, can’t wait to do it again, y’all).

I’m talking about the serious, intrinsic, deep down in your gut, “gotta stick to it or your tummy will hurt” kind of boundary.

So, let me ask you – have your basic personal standards changed (or been altered) as a result of a relationship with a toxic narcissist?

The Boundaries Narcissists Cross QuoteAnd, while we’re asking questions – if you’re unfortunate enough to have a narcissistic parental figure or to have been in the relationship longer than you should, do you even really know what your personal boundaries are, or have they been defined for you?

Narcissists have a way of always pushing your boundaries, sometimes even as a way to amuse themselves when they get bored.

No, I’m not kidding and that is NOT an exaggeration. I’ve been told by more than one narcissist that they just “like to mess with people,” or that they “intentionally start drama to see what people will do.”

Related: How Self-Proclaimed Narcissist Sam Vaknin Gaslighted Me on Facebook

They think it’s funny. But sometimes, their agenda is more calculated than “just to amuse myself,” and that’s when you’ve got to be especially cautious.

And that’s because, when it comes to dealing with a narcissist on the regular, you’ve got to recognize that a certain amount of conditioning happens to all of us – even and maybe especially those of us who are very intelligent.

You might find yourself in a panic if you have to stand up for yourself or to say “no” to someone – and you might even have physical symptoms that include dry mouth, dissociation (where you get kind of confused and foggy) and you might even feel dizzy, nauseous or plain old anxious.

And, of course, this is exactly what the narcissist wants, because it allows him to remain in control. He knows that if he nags, discredits you and/or the boundary he’s repeatedly (or for the first time) crossed, you will eventually get tired of fighting and you’ll just “let it go,” as in, accept it, or at least not require him to justify or discuss it.

This allows the toxic cycle to continue and repeat.

An Example of The Narcissistic Boundary Busting Cycle (IRL)

So, what does this cycle look like in real life?

Let’s use this fictious situation as an example. So, we’ve got this couple, Ned and Jane. Ned is a narcissist, and Jane, his semi-willing victim.

They made a deal at the beginning of their relationship that neither would have close friends of the opposite sex. This deal was made at the request of Ned, and Jane happily complied, letting go of several close male friends to secure her place in Ned’s fickle heart.

Years later, Ned suddenly begins several new friendships with ladies at his office, and then within the couple’s sharred social circles. This doesn’t sit well with Jane, who has consistently avoided friendships with the opposite sex since the boundary was set by Ned in the beginning.

Jane raises concerns, and Ned tells her she’s being paranoid, that she’s got nothing to worry about, but that maybe he (Ned) does – because, clearly, Jane doesn’t blindly trust him.

And you KNOW a narcissist needs his victims to blindly trust him – if they don’t, he will do everything in his power to break them until they at least APPEAR to behave as he wishes.

Instead of attempting to soothe Jane’s fears, Ned plays them up and makes Jane feel like she’s worthless and this continued manipulation and gaslighting makes her afraid of asking about any of his choices, ever, lest he unleash a fury that only a narcissist can – th narcissistic injury and narcissistic rage one-two punch.

So:  
1. Ned the narcissist oversteps Jane’s personal boundary.
2. Jane complains, resists or refuses.
3. He pushes, pleads, prods, discredits and pressures until Jane gives in and accepts the overstep.
4. She redefines her boundary and says something like, “Okay, fine, you can have female friends, but I better never find you hanging out with one alone!”
5. Hours/weeks/days later, when she catches the narcissist doing (or not doing) what she asked him (to do or not do), she obviously confronts him again, reminding him of the previously crossed and redefined boundary.
6. Rinse and repeat. The cycle goes back through the steps.

So, how do you set relationship boundaries with a narcissist?

love kissOkay, let’s talk about relationship boundaries, shall we? 

While everyone’s a little different, there are certain basic boundaries that most everyone could benefit from setting in their lives, if they haven’t already. 

When someone oversteps a relationship boundary in an otherwise healthy relationship, whether it’s spoken or unspoken, it becomes a serious concern for everyone involved.

The person whose boundary has been “overstepped” is made to feel uncomfortable (or worse) and the person who did the stepping doesn’t probably feel much better, assuming he’s not a narcissist.

In most cases, the boundaries can be easily defined and for most people, they can be maintained without extreme effort.

However, some people, especially those who have a tendency to lean toward “people pleasing,” like me, tend to have trouble enforcing boundaries with people who fail to recognize them time and again – enter the narcissist, because you know that they love people pleasers and empaths.

This, of course, leads to a clouding of our general purpose in life, which can lead to depression, anxiety and a number of other emotionally debilitating concerns – all of which can eventually lead to more serious and potentially harmful physical issues. 

Related: Identifying and Managing PTSD After Narcissistic Abuse

So what can you do if you’re stuck in a relationship with a boundary-busting narcissist?

I suggest you try the gray rock rule.

Start Here: Set New Boundaries to Enjoy Healthier Relationships

While many relationships have the capacity to become “good for you,” those with toxic narcissists are generally ill-fated. Still, the fact is that every relationship needs boundaries if you personally want to stay healthy.

Want a simple way to define what a relationship boundary looks like?

Think about it this way: there are certain things you discuss with your best friend that you’d never discuss with your child or your mother. Right? 

See, boundaries help to determine how much you give and receive from a relationship.

If any of your relationships are leaving you irritable and overwhelmed, reexamine your boundaries. That’s a good sign that it’s time to redefine them. 

The boundaries you set in your relationships are a reflection of your ego and self-esteem. 

If you have a low sense of self-worth, your boundaries are going to be unhealthy. You’ll likely to be too focused on trying to please others and receive love and approval. You’ll be overextending yourself and demanding too little from the narcissist.

If your ego is over-inflated, your boundaries are aggressively set to maximize your own utility. It’s your way or the highway. (That’s the role usually played by the narcissist.)

For best results, seek middle ground when setting boundaries.

Using these strategies will help you set boundaries that are empowering for both parties. 

Decide on your core values.

  • What is your comfort level?
  • Are you comfortable discussing your personal finances with others?
  • Do you like friends or family just showing up at your front door or would you like a little warning?
  • Are you willing to let others borrow your car, money, or a cup of sugar?
  • How much honesty do you want to give and receive?

Some of these values will vary depending on the other person. You might let your best friend borrow your car, but no one else. Certain people might be able to spend the night on your couch while others cannot.

Determine what you need from the relationship. Communicate your needs to the other person in a healthy, non-blaming manner. This will require some measure of assertiveness. It’s not fair to expect anyone to read your mind and predict all of your wants and needs.

Determine the other person’s needs. Think win-win and approach the other person with a pleasant conversation about their wishes and needs in the relationship.

Determine the consequences. How will you handle it if someone violates your boundaries? Remind others of your boundaries and then take action. It someone shows up unannounced, don’t let him in your home. If she’s late again, you could leave and go somewhere else.

Be consistent. It’s natural for others to test you when you change the rules. It’s important to be consistent, or you won’t be taken seriously. Follow through and keep your word. One slip into your old patterns and you’ll probably have a battle on your hands.

Be prepared to let go. It’s likely that some individuals will keep on behaving the same way, regardless of your efforts. If a person is unable or unwilling to appreciate your boundaries and requirements, it might be best to reexamine the relationship.

Are your relationship boundaries working for you? Redefining a relationship can be challenging and stressful. Change isn’t always popular. When people can no longer take advantage of you, you’re sure to experience some resistance. But when you maintain your efforts consistently, you and those around you will all ultimately benefit.

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