BE LIMITLESS – learn how to embrace your true power!

BE LIMITLESS – learn how to embrace your true power!

Has being with a narcissist left you living in a perpetual state of fear?

Does your life make you feel helpless to change anything?

Are you living in a perpetual state of fear?

You are not alone – and it is NOT your fault!

Did you know that more people are afraid to succeed than they are to fail?

There is one big reason for this, and it may surprise you when you learn about it.

When people fail, they can find all kinds of reasons or excuses as to why they failed. Well-meaning friends and family members might chime in as to why things didn’t work out.

They will say things like, “it wasn’t meant to be” or “your heart wasn’t in it.”

But they just don’t seem to get what happened – they don’t understand what you’ve been through, do they?

It is NOT your fault.

The truth is that when you’ve been involved with a narcissist, you often live your life based on your fears. Your decisions are driven and dictated by this fear that may have become intrinsic in you, thanks to your abuse.

It’s time to take back your life, and to STOP operating out of fear.

You deserve to be happy.

You deserve to succeed – and you CAN.

When people succeed, there are no excuses.

The steps they took worked. Perhaps it was a fluke that it worked. But what if it happens again? Then, there is no way out of it. Failure has an escape plan; success does not.

The reason people are afraid of success is it forces them out of their comfort zone. They now have to solidify their game plan and continue on the successful path. They can no longer tell people it can’t be done because they did it. It’s proven.

In this five-day course, you’ll learn how to let go of limitations – those you’ve imposed on yourself and those others have imposed on you – and you’ll learn what it takes to become the person you truly want to be.

Wouldn’t it be nice to have the life you really want?

You can start right here.

What You Get When You Take This Course:

*5 days of audio books and downloadable PDF lessons

*Printable affirmations and reflection questions for each day

*A printable journal to help you take your life to the next level

Are you ready to change your perception and change your life?

Start right now by signing up for this course!

Can the law of attraction make you sexy?

Can the law of attraction make you sexy?

“There is no cosmetic for beauty like happiness.” ~ Lady Blessington

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Toxic Narcissist in Your Life? 35+ Tools and Resources That Can Help

Toxic Narcissist in Your Life? 35+ Tools and Resources That Can Help

Update: Click here to visit our new resources center. 

Looking for tools, tips, resources and help with a narcissist in your life? Then you’ve come to the right place. I’ve collected more than 35 of them for you, right here.

I have written several books on narcissism, but I know that not everyone can have books delivered and/or doesn’t have the cash for the Kindle editions. Or maybe they’re afraid of being found out by their very controlling narc.

Listen, I’m not here to judge. I feel you. TRUST ME.

At any rate, that’s why I’ve put together a few links for you here. If you bookmark this post and/or this site, you can refer back to it as needed to get the virtual support and/ir validation that you need.

Consider this site your very own sort of “online ebook” of sorts – no charge, no strings attached. Just because I know how important it is to know that you’re not crazy when you’re in the thick of a relationship with a narcissist.

Is there a narcissist in your life?

Your narcissist could be anyone – your spouse, your child, your mother, your father, your boss – even your best friend or your neighbor. Here are some tips for identifying the one(s) in your life.

What is the definition of a toxic narcissist?

It’s confusing for a lot of people because people think being narcissistic means you take a bunch of selfies and care about how you look. But that’s not necessarily a toxic narcissist – the fact is that every human alive has a certain amount of narcissism in their makeup – it’s self-interest. It’s what makes us get up and get ourselves dressed, feed ourselves, get jobs, get married, have kids – it’s the part of us that prevents us from just giving up entirely.

But a toxic narcissist (or a person with NPD), is someone who has no ability to empathize with other people and who treats the people closest to them accordingly. The toxic narcissist is also referred to as a malignant narcissist.

What’s the difference between narcissism or narcissistic personality disorder and high self-esteem?

 

Are you being manipulated by the narcissist?

We all know that narcissists are master devastating emotional scars narcissism quotemanipulators.

Here are some posts to help you identify and recognize the manipulation.

Can you take control of the situation and/or overpower the narcissist?

beat a narcissist at his own gameIndeed you can, my friend, if you’re willing to stand up for yourself – at least temporarily. Once you’ve recognized the situation, you’re already one step closer. Now you need to know how to get through it. Try these posts for help and ideas.

Can you make the narcissist be nice to you WITHOUT acting like a narcissist yourself?

Yes, absolutely – and it can be done in two ethical, repeatable steps – check it out right here.

Can a narcissist ever really love?

I think we both know the answer to that question, but just in case:

What are some other ways a narcissist will manipulate me?

You might already know all about gaslighting, but that’s just one way that narcissists manipulate people. Here are a few others.

Can you show me an example of real-life gaslighting?

I don’t usually share many personal stories about the gaslighting I have experienced in my life but recently, a well-known narcissist actually gave me a little bit of an unrealized opportunity by actually gaslighting me online.

Oh yea. Online.

What if leaving my narcissist isn’t an option?

It’s not always, and you and I both know this. Unless you’re being physically abused, sometimes it feels like the wolf you know is better than the one that you don’t. But here are some posts to help you get your head in the right place and tools to help you be happier.

Is there a course or class I can take to help me recover from narcissistic abuse?

Absolutely! On this page, you’ll find all kinds of freebies, some of which include online courses. You can also visit Life Makeover Academy, NarcissismSupportCoach.com, or take my Udemy course that helps you to take back your life after narcissistic abuse, right here.

See My Books About Narcissism 

See all of my books, including those on topics such as weight loss and how to be a hot wife at BooksAngieWrote.com.

See the most recent posts about narcissism, gaslighting, and toxic relationships right here. If you have any resources for victims of narcissism in relationships, please share them in the comments section, below. 

Why I Didn’t Argue When a YouTube Viewer Called Me a Narcissist

Why I Didn’t Argue When a YouTube Viewer Called Me a Narcissist

Has someone called you a narcissist, and you don’t believe you fit the bill? I’ve been there – and I’m about to fill you in on a situation that has recently occurred over on my YouTube channel‘s comments section.

You guessed it – I have occasional commenters who claim that I must be a narcissist – obviously, because it’s not possible to understand anyone’s psychology unless you ARE one of those people, right?

Pardon my sarcasm there, but the fact is that MOST people who communicate with me understand where I’m coming from. Generally, those who don’t understand me have a good reason for it – choice or difference in opinion – and maybe, at times, I hit a bit too close to home. Who knows? In any case, I’m once again addressing this silly issue.

In this video, I’ll address these comments – and I’ll fill you in on WHY I won’t argue with people who attempt to label me a narcissist.

Remember:
“Discussion is an exchange of knowledge; an argument an exchange of ignorance.” ~Robert Quillen

AND:
“People’s minds are changed through observation and not through argument.” ~Will Rogers

Look, healthy narcissism is self-focus, self-confidence, self-interest and personal drive, but these qualities must coexist with a healthy concern for others and the ability to genuinely empathize with them.

Unhealthy, toxic narcissism and NPD involve the lack of empathy and concern for others, combined with an unhealthy amount of self-focus. And of course, this kind of narcissistic person is secretly quite insecure and very troubled, in some cases – but you may never know that unless you look beyond the smoke and mirrors.

So, watch that video and let me know what you think. Am I a narcissist? Go ahead, hit me with it. I can take it.

 

 

Boundary-Busting Narcissist? Here’s a Non-Toxic Boundary-Management Plan

Boundary-Busting Narcissist? Here’s a Non-Toxic Boundary-Management Plan

One of the most difficult aspects of being tangled in a narcissist’s web is learning to set firm boundaries with them. Narcissists typically have poor boundaries themselves; they like to win and maintain power, and they don’t like others setting boundaries on them. They even feel above the boundaries of the law — they don’t follow court orders and they find personal boundaries easy to violate.” ~Karyl McBride, MDHow to stop a boundary busting narcissist

If you’re in a relationship with a toxic narcissist, or have ever been in one, you might have a few boundary issues, am I right?

Have you ever thought about the boundaries you had for yourself and your life before you met the narcissist versus the ones you have now, or that you had during the relationship?

Wait. Before you answer that, let me clarify something.

I’m not talking about the fun or silly “I’ll never wear bell bottoms” kind of boundary here (had it, crossed it, can’t wait to do it again, y’all).

I’m talking about the serious, intrinsic, deep down in your gut, “gotta stick to it or your tummy will hurt” kind of boundary.

So, let me ask you – have your basic personal standards changed (or been altered) as a result of a relationship with a toxic narcissist?

The Boundaries Narcissists Cross QuoteAnd, while we’re asking questions – if you’re unfortunate enough to have a narcissistic parental figure or to have been in the relationship longer than you should, do you even really know what your personal boundaries are, or have they been defined for you?

Narcissists have a way of always pushing your boundaries, sometimes even as a way to amuse themselves when they get bored.

No, I’m not kidding and that is NOT an exaggeration. I’ve been told by more than one narcissist that they just “like to mess with people,” or that they “intentionally start drama to see what people will do.”

Related: How Self-Proclaimed Narcissist Sam Vaknin Gaslighted Me on Facebook

They think it’s funny. But sometimes, their agenda is more calculated than “just to amuse myself,” and that’s when you’ve got to be especially cautious.

And that’s because, when it comes to dealing with a narcissist on the regular, you’ve got to recognize that a certain amount of conditioning happens to all of us – even and maybe especially those of us who are very intelligent.

You might find yourself in a panic if you have to stand up for yourself or to say “no” to someone – and you might even have physical symptoms that include dry mouth, dissociation (where you get kind of confused and foggy) and you might even feel dizzy, nauseous or plain old anxious.

And, of course, this is exactly what the narcissist wants, because it allows him to remain in control. He knows that if he nags, discredits you and/or the boundary he’s repeatedly (or for the first time) crossed, you will eventually get tired of fighting and you’ll just “let it go,” as in, accept it, or at least not require him to justify or discuss it.

This allows the toxic cycle to continue and repeat.

An Example of The Narcissistic Boundary Busting Cycle (IRL)

So, what does this cycle look like in real life?

Let’s use this fictious situation as an example. So, we’ve got this couple, Ned and Jane. Ned is a narcissist, and Jane, his semi-willing victim.

They made a deal at the beginning of their relationship that neither would have close friends of the opposite sex. This deal was made at the request of Ned, and Jane happily complied, letting go of several close male friends to secure her place in Ned’s fickle heart.

Years later, Ned suddenly begins several new friendships with ladies at his office, and then within the couple’s sharred social circles. This doesn’t sit well with Jane, who has consistently avoided friendships with the opposite sex since the boundary was set by Ned in the beginning.

Jane raises concerns, and Ned tells her she’s being paranoid, that she’s got nothing to worry about, but that maybe he (Ned) does – because, clearly, Jane doesn’t blindly trust him.

And you KNOW a narcissist needs his victims to blindly trust him – if they don’t, he will do everything in his power to break them until they at least APPEAR to behave as he wishes.

Instead of attempting to soothe Jane’s fears, Ned plays them up and makes Jane feel like she’s worthless and this continued manipulation and gaslighting makes her afraid of asking about any of his choices, ever, lest he unleash a fury that only a narcissist can – th narcissistic injury and narcissistic rage one-two punch.

So:  
1. Ned the narcissist oversteps Jane’s personal boundary.
2. Jane complains, resists or refuses.
3. He pushes, pleads, prods, discredits and pressures until Jane gives in and accepts the overstep.
4. She redefines her boundary and says something like, “Okay, fine, you can have female friends, but I better never find you hanging out with one alone!”
5. Hours/weeks/days later, when she catches the narcissist doing (or not doing) what she asked him (to do or not do), she obviously confronts him again, reminding him of the previously crossed and redefined boundary.
6. Rinse and repeat. The cycle goes back through the steps.

So, how do you set relationship boundaries with a narcissist?

love kissOkay, let’s talk about relationship boundaries, shall we? 

While everyone’s a little different, there are certain basic boundaries that most everyone could benefit from setting in their lives, if they haven’t already. 

When someone oversteps a relationship boundary in an otherwise healthy relationship, whether it’s spoken or unspoken, it becomes a serious concern for everyone involved.

The person whose boundary has been “overstepped” is made to feel uncomfortable (or worse) and the person who did the stepping doesn’t probably feel much better, assuming he’s not a narcissist.

In most cases, the boundaries can be easily defined and for most people, they can be maintained without extreme effort.

However, some people, especially those who have a tendency to lean toward “people pleasing,” like me, tend to have trouble enforcing boundaries with people who fail to recognize them time and again – enter the narcissist, because you know that they love people pleasers and empaths.

This, of course, leads to a clouding of our general purpose in life, which can lead to depression, anxiety and a number of other emotionally debilitating concerns – all of which can eventually lead to more serious and potentially harmful physical issues. 

Related: Identifying and Managing PTSD After Narcissistic Abuse

So what can you do if you’re stuck in a relationship with a boundary-busting narcissist?

I suggest you try the gray rock rule.

Start Here: Set New Boundaries to Enjoy Healthier Relationships

While many relationships have the capacity to become “good for you,” those with toxic narcissists are generally ill-fated. Still, the fact is that every relationship needs boundaries if you personally want to stay healthy.

Want a simple way to define what a relationship boundary looks like?

Think about it this way: there are certain things you discuss with your best friend that you’d never discuss with your child or your mother. Right? 

See, boundaries help to determine how much you give and receive from a relationship.

If any of your relationships are leaving you irritable and overwhelmed, reexamine your boundaries. That’s a good sign that it’s time to redefine them. 

The boundaries you set in your relationships are a reflection of your ego and self-esteem. 

If you have a low sense of self-worth, your boundaries are going to be unhealthy. You’ll likely to be too focused on trying to please others and receive love and approval. You’ll be overextending yourself and demanding too little from the narcissist.

If your ego is over-inflated, your boundaries are aggressively set to maximize your own utility. It’s your way or the highway. (That’s the role usually played by the narcissist.)

For best results, seek middle ground when setting boundaries.

Using these strategies will help you set boundaries that are empowering for both parties. 

Decide on your core values.

  • What is your comfort level?
  • Are you comfortable discussing your personal finances with others?
  • Do you like friends or family just showing up at your front door or would you like a little warning?
  • Are you willing to let others borrow your car, money, or a cup of sugar?
  • How much honesty do you want to give and receive?

Some of these values will vary depending on the other person. You might let your best friend borrow your car, but no one else. Certain people might be able to spend the night on your couch while others cannot.

Determine what you need from the relationship. Communicate your needs to the other person in a healthy, non-blaming manner. This will require some measure of assertiveness. It’s not fair to expect anyone to read your mind and predict all of your wants and needs.

Determine the other person’s needs. Think win-win and approach the other person with a pleasant conversation about their wishes and needs in the relationship.

Determine the consequences. How will you handle it if someone violates your boundaries? Remind others of your boundaries and then take action. It someone shows up unannounced, don’t let him in your home. If she’s late again, you could leave and go somewhere else.

Be consistent. It’s natural for others to test you when you change the rules. It’s important to be consistent, or you won’t be taken seriously. Follow through and keep your word. One slip into your old patterns and you’ll probably have a battle on your hands.

Be prepared to let go. It’s likely that some individuals will keep on behaving the same way, regardless of your efforts. If a person is unable or unwilling to appreciate your boundaries and requirements, it might be best to reexamine the relationship.

Are your relationship boundaries working for you? Redefining a relationship can be challenging and stressful. Change isn’t always popular. When people can no longer take advantage of you, you’re sure to experience some resistance. But when you maintain your efforts consistently, you and those around you will all ultimately benefit.

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