Why do narcissists downplay your worth?

Why do narcissists downplay your worth?

Have you ever wondered why narcissists have a way of minimizing everything you do, say, think, or feel?

Narcissists are never generous with praise unless they’re using it as a way to manipulate you. In general, once they get past the love-bombing phase of the relationship, narcissists have a way of never doing or saying anything to make you feel good about yourself. 

If you feel like you have to work a little harder to earn the praise of a narcissist, it’s not because they’re harder to please or discriminating in their approval. It’s because they have reached the “devalue” phase of the toxic relationship. 

What is the devalue phase of the toxic relationship?

Devaluation is what happens when a narcissist tears you down emotionally, insults you (outright or covertly), and makes you doubt yourself and your self-worth. This is done as part of the cycle of abuse and when effective, it can cause you to believe you don’t have a chance of finding someone better, or that you’re not worthy of love or consideration.

The narcissist will often use devaluation to keep you from leaving by implanting such ideas in your head. Alternatively, some narcissists don’t even recognize they’re doing it since it’s part of the standard cycle of abuse. It can happen to a “thing” just as easily as a person when a narcissist is involved.

Why does the narcissist downplay your worth?

Narcissists downplay your worth and highlight their own accomplishments, in part because they want to keep you feeling inferior, but it’s more complicated than this. In fact, narcissists use their “false selves” to mask their deeply profound insecurity and often use this tactic to sort of boost their own ego.

It’s all about making sure they have control over us and keeping us feeling less than them so they can get what they want out of life while using our goodwill as leverage against us when needed.

In other words, they need to feel that they are above you, that they are superior to you in every single way.

What does it mean when the narcissist compliments you?

Do you sometimes feel that when narcissists do compliment you or praise you it is not genuine? Well, you are right. It isn’t. As a matter of fact; narcissists downplay the worth of those with whom they wish to gain favor.

If we are on their good side (during the idealization or love-bombing phase), then we will get compliments from them about how wonderful we are doing at work or school or even in our personal relationships.

Sometimes when narcissists compliment us, it is done so in a way that makes us feel inferior or lesser than them – or it’s about impressing someone else who overhears the compliment. The other reason a narcissist might compliment you outside of the love-bombing phase is to take credit for your work or efforts in some way.

Explaining by Example: The Narcissist at Work

In order to understand this behavior better; let us consider an example of how someone with narcissistic personality disorder might behave in a work environment. The narcissist will often claim credit for various projects even if he or she had nothing to do with their completion or success.

They will brag about their accomplishments and compare them favorably to others’. At the same time, he or she will also put down coworkers and subordinates who may have made similar contributions but not received as much recognition as they did.

Narcissists like to make themselves seem better than everyone else around them, especially if these people have something that the narcissist does not have (money, power, fame).

So, when a narcissist compliments you, it is not because of your worth, beauty, or talents. It is to get you under their authority so that they can use your talents for their own good.

Learn more about narcissists and the devalue phase of the toxic relationship

In this video, I explain the devalue phase in detail and offer tips on how to deal with the narcissist who is actively downplaying your worth. 

Start Getting Help with Narcissistic Abuse Recovery Today

 

 

What is Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD)?

What is Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD)?

What is Borderline Personality Disorder?

BPD is a mental health disorder or personality disorder that manifests in a number of symptoms, including an ongoing pattern of mood swings, distorted self-image, and various behavior issues. While this disorder is sometimes mistaken for narcissistic personality disorder, the two are different in that people with BPD have empathy, and those with NPD do not.

Survivors of narcissistic abuse are sometimes misdiagnosed with BPD, and clearly, its symptoms can result in impulsive actions and major problems in relationships.

Symptoms of Borderline Personality Disorder

While BPD is sometimes mistaken for narcissistic personality disorder, the two are different in that people with BPD have empathy, and those with NPD do not. Survivors of narcissistic abuse are sometimes misdiagnosed with BPD, and clearly, its symptoms can result in impulsive actions and major problems in relationships. People who have BPD can be unstable at times and be erratic and unpredictable in their behavior.

Someone with BPD might struggle to form and maintain healthy, stable relationships. They often struggle with their self-image as well as their self-worth as they both fluctuate frequently. In some situations, you’ll notice someone with BPD might act totally “normal,” while other times, the same person might be completely out of the ordinary, unpredictable, and incredibly inappropriate.

Their level of impulse control can also be impaired when they’re feeling overwhelmed or frustrated.

Are more men or women diagnosed with BPD?

While most people diagnosed with BPD are female, men can also be affected.  When narcissistic abuse is involved, in some cases, someone who is diagnosed with BPD might actually be diagnosed with C-PTSD (complex post-traumatic stress disorder). if their doctors understood how the trauma and abuse had affected their lives and psychology.

More on BPD Symptoms, Signs and BPD and NPD Similarities

In this video, we’re going to talk about the signs and symptoms of borderline personality disorder and how BPD and NPD are very different in some ways – but they’re also surprisingly similar in some ways. Mental illness and personality disorders can change your life in some serious ways. People in relationships with BPD can often struggle to keep their emotions on track – especially when those relationships also involve narcissists.

Related articles

When Narcissists Use Religion to Control You

When Narcissists Use Religion to Control You

Are you dealing with religious abuse or spiritual abuse?

Are you dealing with religious abuse or spiritual abuse from a narcissist? If so, you’re not alone. Narcissists are infamous for using religion to manipulate, control and absolutely dominate you through fear of what will happen to you if you don’t do what they want.

In this video, Narcissists and Religious Abuse (AKA Spiritual Abuse): When Narcissists Use Religion to Control You, I’ll define religious abuse and outline how narcissists use it against you.

What is religious/spiritual abuse?

The official definition of religious/spiritual abuse: Religious abuse is abuse administered under the guise of religion, including harassment or humiliation, which may result in psychological trauma. Religious abuse may also include misuse of religion for selfish, secular, or ideological ends such as the abuse of a clerical position.

Start Getting Help with Narcissistic Abuse Recovery Today

Online help is readily available for survivors of narcissistic abuse. Here are some options to begin healing from narcissistic abuse right away.

Related articles

How to Build the Courage to Leave an Abusive Partner

When you’re in an abusive relationship, it can be difficult to see the way out. But, you don’t have to be trapped in a relationship with an abusive partner. Here’s some help.

How do you safely leave an abusive partner?

Discover how to separate yourself from them in a safe way by using these strategies:

Be honest with yourself about why you haven’t already left.

Understand why you stay. You can’t gain the courage to leave until you understand why you’re staying. Are these reasons preventing you from leaving,

  • Maybe you’re staying out of fear.
  • You may feel stuck in the relationship because it’s the only thing you have right now. Despite the issues, it’s a familiar place. You may even feel secure in the familiarity.
  • You might even stay because you feel that you deserve to be punished. You’re worried that you won’t be able to find someone else who is better. And, because of the abuse, you may feel responsible for the situation.
  • In addition, perhaps you believe that you can fix the issues. You may think that if you love your partner enough, then they will stop being abusive.

Focus on getting stronger, mentally and emotionally.

 Strengthen your self-esteem. Low self-esteem is at the root of many abusive relationships. Increasing your confidence and self-esteem will help you gain the courage to leave the abuser. You can start by acknowledging that your self-esteem needs work.

  • Look for causes for your low self-esteem. Were your parents perfectionists who expected too much from you? Did you feel inadequate growing up or at work? Once you have the answers, you can work to resolve your feelings about your past. You can put the past in the past and ensure that these negative feelings don’t affect who you are today.
  •  To raise your self-esteem, do a nice thing for yourself each day. Pay attention to what others say about you that is positive. Journal about it or take notes, so you always have a reminder of your positive aspects.

Set up a proper support system.

Get outside help. It may benefit you to get help from friends, family, or others. You may need to turn to therapy or a doctor. In some cases, outside help is needed to leave an abusive relationship.

  • Your friends, family, coworkers, or others may be able to assist you so you won’t be alone and can develop the courage to leave. There may also be community resources, nonprofits, and organizations that can help.
  • You might want to work with a therapist or a coach.

Consider the costs.

Figure out your finances. Are you scared to leave your partner because you depend on them financially? Maybe you’re dealing with financial abuse, too? If you know that you’re financially secure, then it’s easier to leave.

  •  When you have a job, set money aside that your abuser can’t access. You can also ask friends or family to contribute to your savings.
  • When you don’t have a job, you have to be more creative. You may be able to save money from the stipends you receive. You may be able to sell some items.
  • Even if you’re not certain about your finances, you can make plans for the future. Prepare for a job that can support you after this relationship ends.

You don’t have to stay with an abusive partner out of fear. Relationships can be difficult to end, but it’s not impossible. Figure out a way to escape and leave them, even if you need someone to help you do it. There are resources and people who can help you get out of your abusive situation and get started in a healthier life.

Start Getting Help with Narcissistic Abuse Recovery Today

Online help is readily available for survivors of narcissistic abuse. Here are some options to begin healing from narcissistic abuse right away.

 

 

Related articles

Toxic Narcissist in Your Life? 35+ Tools and Resources That Can Help

Toxic Narcissist in Your Life? 35+ Tools and Resources That Can Help

Update: Click here to visit our new resources center. 

Looking for tools, tips, resources and help with a narcissist in your life? Then you’ve come to the right place. I’ve collected more than 35 of them for you, right here.

I have written several books on narcissism, but I know that not everyone can have books delivered and/or doesn’t have the cash for the Kindle editions. Or maybe they’re afraid of being found out by their very controlling narc.

Listen, I’m not here to judge. I feel you. TRUST ME.

At any rate, that’s why I’ve put together a few links for you here. If you bookmark this post and/or this site, you can refer back to it as needed to get the virtual support and/ir validation that you need.

Consider this site your very own sort of “online ebook” of sorts – no charge, no strings attached. Just because I know how important it is to know that you’re not crazy when you’re in the thick of a relationship with a narcissist.

Is there a narcissist in your life?

Your narcissist could be anyone – your spouse, your child, your mother, your father, your boss – even your best friend or your neighbor. Here are some tips for identifying the one(s) in your life.

What is the definition of a toxic narcissist?

It’s confusing for a lot of people because people think being narcissistic means you take a bunch of selfies and care about how you look. But that’s not necessarily a toxic narcissist – the fact is that every human alive has a certain amount of narcissism in their makeup – it’s self-interest. It’s what makes us get up and get ourselves dressed, feed ourselves, get jobs, get married, have kids – it’s the part of us that prevents us from just giving up entirely.

But a toxic narcissist (or a person with NPD), is someone who has no ability to empathize with other people and who treats the people closest to them accordingly. The toxic narcissist is also referred to as a malignant narcissist.

What’s the difference between narcissism or narcissistic personality disorder and high self-esteem?

 

Are you being manipulated by the narcissist?

We all know that narcissists are master devastating emotional scars narcissism quotemanipulators.

Here are some posts to help you identify and recognize the manipulation.

Can you take control of the situation and/or overpower the narcissist?

beat a narcissist at his own gameIndeed you can, my friend, if you’re willing to stand up for yourself – at least temporarily. Once you’ve recognized the situation, you’re already one step closer. Now you need to know how to get through it. Try these posts for help and ideas.

Can you make the narcissist be nice to you WITHOUT acting like a narcissist yourself?

Yes, absolutely – and it can be done in two ethical, repeatable steps – check it out right here.

Can a narcissist ever really love?

I think we both know the answer to that question, but just in case:

What are some other ways a narcissist will manipulate me?

You might already know all about gaslighting, but that’s just one way that narcissists manipulate people. Here are a few others.

Can you show me an example of real-life gaslighting?

I don’t usually share many personal stories about the gaslighting I have experienced in my life but recently, a well-known narcissist actually gave me a little bit of an unrealized opportunity by actually gaslighting me online.

Oh yea. Online.

What if leaving my narcissist isn’t an option?

It’s not always, and you and I both know this. Unless you’re being physically abused, sometimes it feels like the wolf you know is better than the one that you don’t. But here are some posts to help you get your head in the right place and tools to help you be happier.

Is there a course or class I can take to help me recover from narcissistic abuse?

Absolutely! On this page, you’ll find all kinds of freebies, some of which include online courses. You can also visit Life Makeover Academy, NarcissismSupportCoach.com, or take my Udemy course that helps you to take back your life after narcissistic abuse, right here.

See My Books About Narcissism 

See all of my books, including those on topics such as weight loss and how to be a hot wife at BooksAngieWrote.com.

See the most recent posts about narcissism, gaslighting, and toxic relationships right here. If you have any resources for victims of narcissism in relationships, please share them in the comments section, below. 

Pin It on Pinterest