Do-Over? Today is the First Day of the Rest of Your Life

Do-Over? Today is the First Day of the Rest of Your Life

“If you do what you’ve always done, you’ll get what you’ve always gotten.” -Tony Robbins

Today is the very first day of the rest of your life. Today, you get to decide exactly who you are, what you’ll accept and how your day will go. You are powerful and you are in charge. Now, let’s do this.

Create Rules For Your Life That Serve You Well

Having rules that govern your life, behavior, and choices might seem confining and restrictive. But there’s a profound freedom that comes from living by a set of rules that you’ve chosen for yourself. You can refrain from toiling over as many decisions.

It’s pretty easy, really.

You just follow your own rules.

For example, let’s say you had the rule that you’re never going to lie to your partner. Because that’s a rule, you never have to ask yourself whether you should tell the truth. And you don’t struggle to keep track of which lie you told him or her–fact is, you know what you said because you said what was true.

Bam–huge amount of stress–gone! When you follow the rules you make and never go rogue, you avoid the drama and the emotional drain. In the case of our example, you simply tell the truth and get on with life. Easy–simple–underrated.

How to Create Life Rules That Work FOR You

Develop your own set of rules for each aspect of your life. Rules provide the framework for having a more productive and stress-free life.

Need help creating a unique set of rules for your own life? Check out this example for some inspiration.

1. I always go to bed and get up at times that provide me with the opportunity to get a minimum of 8 hours of sleep.

2. I refrain from checking email before 10 AM or after 4 PM.

3. I refuse to answer the phone when I’m spending time with my family.

4. I tell everyone in my family that I love them at least once per day.

5. I accept full responsibility for all outcomes in my life, both good and bad.

6. I read a minimum of 30 minutes per day.

7. I speak to all of my friends at least once each month.

8. I meditate every night for 10 minutes before I go to sleep.

9. Before bed, I make a list of the most important items to complete the following day.

And so on.

Why You Need the Rules

Each week, we all make choices that result in guilty or remorseful feelings. But we also make tough decisions that we know are correct. Having a list of rules for your behavior makes it easier to make wise decisions with less mental turmoil.

Your rules can move you closer to your goals, as well as remove frustration from your life.

More Help: Tips to Flesh Out Your Life Rules

1. Make a list of your most important goals. It’s helpful to have goals related to your finances, health, family, and personal accomplishments. If you know your goals, you can develop rules that support them.

2. What are your values? When you’re behaving in a manner that’s congruent with your values, you’ll be much happier and more successful.

3. What obstacles stand in your way? How do you waste time? What are your weaknesses? Rules that eliminate or minimize the challenges in your life are worthwhile.

4. What example do you want to set for your children? If you have children, what do you want them to see when they watch you? They’re always watching, even if you think they aren’t.

Most of us are striving for a greater degree of freedom, and rules seem like a limit to freedom. However, you free up a lot of mental resources when you make important decisions beforehand. If your rule is to exercise every day, then you can avoid having to spend 20 minutes deciding whether or not to exercise. You just do it.

Assignment: Draft Your Personal Life Rules

Take the time to make your own set of rules. The number doesn’t matter. Start with a couple and add more as you see fit. Make some rules for yourself in order to set yourself free.

  • Take a few moments to come up with a working draft of your personal life rules.
  • Document the rules, either on paper on electronically.
  • Do this exercise in your personal journal (online or offline) and/or your blog.
  • If you choose to publish your exercises (and I truly hope that you do–I feel like it’s sort of an announcement to the Universe about your intentions to create positive change in your life), please send me the URL on Facebook so I can share it!

Alright, that’s it. Pretty simple, right? Let’s do this! Don’t forget to share your thoughts and/or your URL in the comments or on my Facebook page.

Bliss Mission: 7 Ways to Be More Productive

Bliss Mission: 7 Ways to Be More Productive

First Meeting“Once you have mastered time, you will understand how true it is that most people overestimate what they can accomplish in a year – and underestimate what they can achieve in a decade!” ~Tony Robbins

Being productive feels good. On those days that I manage to do all the things on my excessively long to-do list, I just feel amazing. But then, there are those days where I don’t quite hit the mark, and I find myself feeling less than stellar.

(Insider Tip: You can learn to use feng shui principles to increase your productivity when you sign up for Feng Shui Fest–it’s FREE!)

I love my work, and though I occasionally have a tendency to take on too much, I still keep plugging–most days. And then, there are those days where I just feel like I can’t get anything done. What about you?

Do you ever feel like your productivity level is slipping a bit?

Maybe you thought you’d get four projects done today, but you completed only two. You ask yourself where the time goes and you’ve noticed you’re feeling disappointed in yourself and how you perform at work or at home.

Don’t worry, you’re not alone–this is all part of being human. But there are some simple things you can do to increase your efficiency and get more out of your life.

Hit the ground running. Be ready to go to work as soon as you arrive, whether you’re commuting an hour to your corporate job or 10 steps to a home office.

Using the example of work, visualize yourself on the way into the office, and then think about what it’s going to be like when you get there. Do you have three large stacks of paperwork to do? Articles to write, research to do? Phone calls to return?

Think about what you’ll do first. Perhaps you can complete that project you started last Friday with just a couple more hours of work. Put your mind ahead of your body’s arrival so you can get started quickly.

Learn to anticipate. When you consider what will be happening next, you’ll be ready to meet whatever challenge is occurring at the time.

For example, at home, you might think, “I know the kids will be hungry for a snack. I’ll get out that fruit salad from yesterday and give them glasses of juice right away so I can get to the laundry.”

Anticipate what might happen, and have a plan.

Develop a method of keeping track of tasks that works for you. Whether it’s speaking your list into your smartphone, jotting down things to do in your calendar, or carrying a spiral notebook, having a running list to look at or listen to will help you get more things done.

For me, it’s all about Google Calendar–I can have multiple, color-coded calendars in one, and I can share various calendars with various parties. In my case, I have a personal calendar as well as various work/editorial calendars, among others. All sync to my phone, and for the really important stuff, I set reminders to help me remember–sometimes several.

Whichever method you choose, be sure it’s convenient and works for you. Having some way to check-off items is helpful so you can tell at a glance which tasks you’ve completed and which ones remain–this also increases your sense of accomplishment and can help encourage you to keep on keeping on.

If you don’t already have a calendar or task manager tool in place, try a couple of methods until you find the list that’s easiest for you to use. There’s no one-size-fits-all solution here. Just find something that fits in your life and go with it.

Politely tell others you don’t “have a minute.” If you’re at work and people stop by your office to chat, feel free to say, “I’m sorry. I can’t talk right now but I’d love to have lunch today and hear more about this.”

When you don’t allow yourself to be interrupted, you can get a lot more done. Plus, others learn to avoid interrupting your work time.

On that same note, remember that you are not Superman or Superwoman, and that you have the right to say no, sometimes. For example, in my case, I might need to push back a deadline or explain that my schedule is too full to be on that committee or to plan that party.

I’m not going to lie. This one is hard for me. I find myself saying yes and just “making stuff happen.” But at times, this attitude makes my life more difficult in a number of ways, including lack of sleep, lack of personal time and more.

So sometimes, we all have to be strong and explain that we just don’t have time–and if possible, we can offer alternative options, but if not, we just have to politely say no.

Keep meetings brief. If you’re in a position to have control over meetings at work, make a goal to meet for 30 minutes max. If you go into a meeting with a written agenda, you’ll be ready to cover your points quickly.

Personally, I have a weekly meeting with my team at Scrubs & Suits. We always try to come in with an agenda, and since we’re a creative and inspired bunch, we have a tendency to get off-track and the  meetings can run long. But when I remind everyone early in the meeting that we are limited to a certain period of time, we manage to stay on track a bit more effectively.

So, when you’re leading a meeting, involve the group in helping to manage the time. And, if you’re not leading but you’re attending the meeting,  you can do your part by helping the group to stay focused.

Reinforce your efforts to achieve. Praise yourself each day. Maybe you completed a work project you’ve been working on for several weeks or cooked a great meal for friends and family.

Recognize the efforts you make to complete tasks. You deserve it, and you’re worth it–and you don’t need to wait for others to notice. Celebrate yourself, and stay positive about your efforts and achievements.

Allow yourself plenty of time in the morning. If you need an hour to shower, have breakfast and get your task list written for the day, then get up early enough to have your full hour.

When you respect your own needs, you’ll be better emotionally prepared to get things accomplished–and you’ll feel better when you make the effort to present the best possible version of yourself to the world around you.

And if you work at home, don’t think you’re exempt from this idea. You should still get up every morning (most mornings, anyway) and get ready as you would if you worked in an office–whether you’re a stay-at-home parent or you work from your home office, something about “getting ready for work” will change your mindset and help to increase your productivity levels (and you won’t have to hide when the UPS guy shows up.)

So, how about you? What are your best tips for increasing productivity and eliminating procrastination from  your life? Let’s discuss! Share your thoughts in the comments section, below.

 

Bliss Mission: 7 Ways to Be More Productive

Bliss Tips: 12 Ways to Heal After an Emotional Trauma

EmotionFrom time to time, we all experience unfortunate events, situations, and traumas. Although traumas might involve physical injuries and damage, they can also be emotional. If unaddressed, the results of these emotional experiences can last for years.

Today, we’re focusing on the emotional aspects of trauma and what you can do to expedite your recovery. Do you have old hurts that could use your attention? You can also use this as a guide the next time you experience an intense situation that leaves you emotionally smarting for a while.

These trauma coping strategies will help you heal.

  •  Compliment yourself on making it through. You’re here and you’re alive. Whether your trauma involved only emotions or physical injury as well, the fact is that you’re strong enough to have survived.
  • Allow time to recuperate. You may not be completely recovered by next week. Healing from emotional trauma takes time and rest. In the evenings after work, allow yourself some time to relax.
  • Take it easy on yourself. Depending on your emotional trauma, you may still be going to work and carrying out your everyday life while you’re healing. Maybe you didn’t finish every task you wanted to complete while at work. Remind yourself that you’re doing what you can to get better and will soon be as efficient as ever.
  • Think positive. Long known to conquer many afflictions, thinking positive thoughts will help you speed up your healing. When you’re thinking troubling thoughts like, “I feel so sad today,” remind yourself, “I’m taking important steps each day to feel better.”
  • Find moments in each day to do what you like to do. Even if it’s just for 30 minutes a day, sit outdoors and watch the birds, work on the bookshelf you’re building, or check out your social media websites. Staying in touch with the things you love will speed your recovery.
  • Let yourself cry. If you feel emotions building up inside you, it’s quite natural to want to release them by having a good cry. Crying will provide some relief and help you leave some of your pain behind you. Go ahead and cry.
  • Listen to the music you love. Nothing brings joy to the soul in quite the same manner as music. Your prescription is: listen to music each day for at least 15 minutes. Some days you’ll find yourself extending that time a bit and maybe even singing along. Music will help you heal.
  • Pamper yourself. If ever there’s a time to indulge in the creature comforts you love, it’s whenever you’re healing from trauma. On your day off, lie on the couch and read a book. Play games all day with your kids. Take a nice long walk with your best friend.
  • Watch situation comedies on television. Laughing is good for your emotional healing process. You’ve probably seen a few comedies that you find humorous and entertaining. Now’s the time to ensure you watch a few every week. This is a bit of healthy escapism.
  • Incorporate physical movement into your day. Provided the doctor says it’s okay, engage in some physical activity each day. Go for a swim. Lift weights, or get on the treadmill. Physical exercise releases endorphins, the “feel good” hormones.
  • Surround yourself with the people you love. Play with your kids. Talk to your partner. Call your best friend. Invite your brother over for a visit. Remind yourself of all the positive people you have in your life and take advantage of their loving care and support.
  • Recognize when you need professional help. Allowing your emotional injuries to prevent you from living a full life is unproductive, at least after the initial few weeks or months. Instead, call a local mental health professional to help you sort through your challenging times.

Healing emotionally after a trauma takes time, patience, and effort. Put the above strategies into action to speed your emotional recovery. Trust that you’ll be better soon and discover the rich, full life that’s waiting for you.

 

Affirmations & Reflections: Balancing Personal and Professional Life

Affirmations & Reflections: Balancing Personal and Professional Life

I balance my personal and professional life.

I am a firm believer that the healthiest lifestyle is one that is balanced. Imbalance can create untenable situations in my life and cause things to break down, while balance helps me to achieve peace of mind.

I place significant importance on both my personal and professional life. Both aspects of my life play a great part in making me who I am. I recognize that there is a time and place for everything, and I strive to listen to my gut instincts when they tell me it is time to shift focus.

I love my job and what it allows me to achieve. I spend much time dedicated to excelling in my craft, and feel rewarded when my hard work pays off. I know how to take that success in stride and also when to take a break from work and focus on my personal life.

My personal life helps to balance the efforts, dedication and hard work in my professional life. Spending time on non-work activities makes dealing with work stress a lot easier. Plus, the important people in my personal life appreciate my efforts to spend time with them.

Today, I commit to focusing on finding that fine balance between my personal and professional pursuits. I feel happier when I allow elements of both sides of my life to take priority at the opportune time.

Self-Reflection Questions:

1. Do I work equally as hard on my personal life as I do on my professional life?
2. Can situations around me teach me how to balance personal and professional concerns?
3. How do I react when people tell me that I am not giving enough in one aspect of my life?

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